December Announcements

Hello Fellow CBSM Section Members!

Here are some announcements for the beginning of the month.

1.  New Mobilizing Ideas Dialogue—Grace Yukich, David Ortiz, Rory McVeigh, and Dan Myers.

2.  CFP, Sociological Focus, Special Issue on Black Movements—Joyce M. Bell.

3.  New Edition of Revolutions by Jack A. Goldstone—Oxford University Press.

4.  Call for Nominations: The 2014 McCarthy Award—Rory McVeigh.

Also, please check out the new CBSM Web site http://cbsm-asa.org/, if you have not already.

All the best,

Edwin

1.  Mobilizing Ideas—Grace Yukich, David Ortiz, Rory McVeigh, and Dan Myers.

New Mobilizing Ideas Essay Dialogue: Social Movement Failure

Mobilizing Ideas‘ December’s essay dialogue focuses on why some social movements fail. We have asked social movement scholars, other social scientists, and organizers to reflect on the following: What are the key reasons that some movements never take off or fizzle out before succeeding? What are we missing if we ignore social movement failures? How should we understand failure, what is the role of intentional and unintentional outcomes, and how do we measure failed movements?

Contributors to the first round of essays on this topic are the following, with more to come this month and next: Edwin Amenta (University of California, Irvine), Christian Davenport (University of Michigan), Daniel Escher (University of Notre Dame), Marco Giugni (University of Geneva), Kevan Harris (Princeton University), and Jen McKernan (AFT Michigan).

Our goal is to stimulate scholarly debate and discussion around this important topic, so please share your reactions to these posts in the comments section.

Thank you for supporting Mobilizing Ideas.

Editors in Chief,

Grace Yukich, David Ortiz, Rory McVeigh, and Dan Myers

 

2.  CFP, Sociological Focus, Special Issue on Black Movements—Joyce M. Bell.

Sociological Focus

Special Issue on Black Movements

Edited by Joyce M. Bell

Sociological Focus invites papers for a special issue on black social movements. This special issue offers scholars an opportunity to both re-examine old movements and to bring new movements to our attention.  Social movement theory has made significant advances in understanding how social movements relate to, affect and are shaped by a variety of social phenomena. Much of that theory was developed through a study of the black civil rights movement in the US, which means that we know less about other black movement formations. Even less attention has been paid to how racism and racial inequality keep shaping black social movements long beyond their emergence.  Papers in this issue should focus on contemporary or historical movement formations that are explicitly created by black people, aimed at black issues, and/or rooted in black political traditions. We are particularly interested in papers that examine black movements against racism and racial inequality in all areas of social life both in the US and globally. We welcome papers that use a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches.

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

Black feminist movement

Black movements in Europe

Black movements in Latin America

Black movements in the United States

Black movements within organizations

Black radicalism

Black Arts movement

Black Power movement

Black nationalism

Civil Rights Movement

Environmental justice movement

Movements against the prison industrial complex

Movements to free political prisoners

Relationships between black movements and other areas of sociological study: education, the arts, family, the life-course, organizations, politics, religion, work, etc.

Relationships between black movements and other movements

Theorizing race and social movements

This special issue will be edited by Joyce M. Bell (jmb267@pitt.edu), a member of the Sociological Focus editorial board. The editor welcomes submissions engaged with sociological studies of social movements, race, and black movement formations from early career through established scholars.

The word limit for articles is 8,000 words, including bibliography. All manuscripts must be submitted through ScholarOne and are subject to the normal double-anonymous refereeing process, but potential authors are welcome to discuss their ideas in advance with the Editor. The deadline for submitting papers is Friday, February 21st. Please submit athttp://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/usfo and choose the special issue under manuscript type.

3.  New Edition of Revolutions by Jack A. Goldstone—Oxford University Press.

Revolutions: A Very Short Introduction  by Jack A. Goldstone is now available for January delivery from Oxford University Press:

http://global.oup.com/academic/product/revolutions-a-very-short-introduction-9780199858507?cc=us&lang=en&tab=overview

Completely new and up-to-date (through the Rouhani election in Iran), including an emphasis on social justice, leadership, revolutionary processes and outcomes, it is brief and affordable at 160 pp. and $11.95 in paperback.

4.  Call for Nominations: The 2014 McCarthy Award—Rory McVeigh.

Call for Nominations for the McCarthy Award

The Center for the Study of Social Movements at the University of Notre Dame invites nominations for the 2014 John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship of Social Movements and Collective Behavior.  The award honors scholars who have made “outstanding contributions to the scholarly literature concerned with social movements, protest, collective violence, riots, and other kinds of collective behavior over the course of her or his career.  The recipient will be a person who has made major contributions not only through her or his own research, but also through teaching and mentoring other, more junior, scholars as they have developed their own research and scholarly identities.”

The award recipient will receive the award in the spring of 2014 in a ceremony held at the University of Notre Dame in conjunction with the Center’s fifth Young Scholars in Social Movements Conference.  In addition to attending the award ceremony and banquet, the selected recipient will deliver the closing keynote lecture for the conference and have the opportunity to consult with faculty and graduate students about their ongoing research projects.

Previous Winners of the McCarthy Award:

2007  John McCarthy (Inaugural Award)

2008  Verta Taylor

2009  Mayer Zald

2010  Doug McAdam

2011  William Gamson

2012  Pamela Oliver

2013  David Snow

Please send the names of nominees, along with a brief statement supporting the nomination, no later than January 15, 2014 to  Rory McVeigh, McCarthy Award Committee Chair, rmcveigh@nd.edu (email nominations strongly preferred)

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