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Addressing intersectionality: social movements and the politics of inclusivity

Workshop organizers: Elizabeth Evans, Goldsmiths, University of London, Ilana Eloit, London School of Economicsn and Eléonore Lépinard, University of Lausanne

Eleonore.Lepinard@unil.ch , Elizabeth.evans@gold.ac.uk , i.m.eloit@lse.ac.uk

All papers for our workshop must be submitted via MyECPR:

https://ecpr.eu/Login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fEvents%2fEventDetails.aspx%3fEventID%3d112

We will not be able to approve any papers that are submitted directly to us, as they will need to be in the system.  Feel free to contact us if you have any queries.

For submission guidelines and further instructions, please visit the ECPR website:

https://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=112

The deadline for paper proposals is Wednesday 6th December.

Workshop outline:

Social movements play a critical role in local, national and international politics, mobilising a range of diverse groups and interests. Exploring who is included and who is excluded within these movements is a critical project. It is a task that requires an intersectional lens to examine how multiple and overlapping points of oppression shape power dynamics within social movements. Such an approach, enables scholars to identify the challenges that a lack of heterogeneity poses to the legitimacy, accountability and representational functions of social movement politics.

With historical and theoretical roots in Black feminism and women of color activism, intersectionality is a concept forged to address concerns relating to inclusivity and representation in social movement (Davis 1981, hooks 1981, Moraga and Anzaldúa 1981, Lorde 1984, Crenshaw 1989).  More than four decades later, acknowledging diversity, inequalities invisibilities, as well as desires to “organize on one’s own” (Roth 2004) amongst political activists has become increasingly important to gender and politics, LGBTQI+ politics, and race and politics scholars; many of whom argue that identifying and analyzing power dynamics between and amongst different identity groups is critical to exploring issues of access and inclusion within civil society movements (e.g. Crenshaw 1991, Strolovitch 2008, Springer 2005).

However, this call for an intersectional perspective on social movement’s discourses, practices and politics of alliances and conflicts is far from being systematically adopted by social movements scholars. Whilst intersectionality has constituted a paradigm shift in gender studies (Hancock, 2007), and has become increasingly important for scholars of race and ethnicity as well as LGBTQI politics (Kearl, 2015), it is not clear whether those active within other types of social movement, or those studying them, also take account of difference and the interactive effects of identity markers and structural inequalities. While research exploring intersectionality and social movements will necessarily appeal to scholars of women’s, civil rights, labor unions, migrant rights and LGBTQI+ movements; issues of inclusion, accessibility and accountability are critical for all of those working on social movement studies.

The purpose of this workshop is to develop a new research network that is dedicated to exploring the conceptual, empirical and methodological challenges and opportunities that applying an intersectional framework offers to scholars of social movement studies who are looking to apply it to new areas. Hence, this research network will bring together those working on empirical and theoretical studies that examine a range of different social movements, in order to develop new ways of thinking about, and applying, intersectionality.

We invite papers that explore the current ‘state’ of intersectionality politics and the politics of intersectionality as they apply to social movements in Europe and around the world. In particular, we welcome papers that address inter-related and politically relevant questions concerning the ways in which we apply and theorize intersectionality in our studies of social movements:

  • How does the politics of exclusion or inclusion play out within social movements?
  •  How does race, religion, gender, sexuality, disability, and class structure activism in various contexts and at different levels (national/transnational)?
  • Which kinds of social movements take account of intersectionality and how?
  • How are movements and organizations trying to put in practice(s) intersectionality?
  • How is intersectionality shaping alliances or conflicts between movements and organizations?
  • What are the strategies, tactical repertoires, boundary making and identity-building practices forged by movements representing multiply-marginalized groups in different contexts? How do they negotiate the tension between self-organization and alliance with/inclusion in other movements?
  • Do social movements that are not based upon traditional categories of identity politics, such as animal rights or labor movements, reflect upon issues of differences/inclusion?
  • What can an intersectional lens bring to studies of identity and affect within movements?
  • How can intersectionality help us address the success or failure of specific tactical repertoires?
  • How does the language and discourse of intersectionality – or other concepts that might be used to designate similar issues – affect debates concerning inclusion in different countries and in different movements?
  • What are the methodological tools that must be developed to foster an intersectional perspective in social movements studies?

This timely workshop will provide a critical reflection on both the historic and conceptual development of the intersectional framework, as well as facilitating empirical and theoretical analyses of future directions for the role of intersectionality in social movement research.

Call for Award Nominations 2017

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Student Paper Award

Anyone without a PhD in 2016 is considered a student, and any paper (published or unpublished) written in 2016 by a student or students (i.e., no PhD coauthors) is eligible.  A previously submitted paper may be resubmitted only if significantly revised.  Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members. No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  $500 will be awarded.  Send a copy of the paper electronically to each of the committee members by March 1, 2017.

 

Mayer Zald Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award Committee:  

Jennifer Earl (Chair), jenniferearl@email.arizona.edu

Ziad Munson, munson@lehigh.edu

Lee Ann Banaszak, lab14@psu.edu

Marcos Perez, meperez@colby.edu

Han Zhang, hz2@Princeton.EDU

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Article Award

Articles and chapters from edited books with publication dates of 2016 are eligible. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send a copy of the article electronically to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2017:

 

Best Published Article Award Committee:

Belinda Robnett (Chair), brobnett@uci.edu

John Krinsky, jkrinsky.ccny@gmail.com

Edward Walker, walker@soc.ucla.edu

Bogdan Vasi, ion-vasi@uiowa.edu

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award

Section members, authors, or publishers may nominate books with publication dates of 2016. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members or publishers.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send or have publishers send a copy of the book to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2017:

 

Charles Tilly Award for Best Book Committee: 

Kenneth (Andy) Andrews, (Chair), kta1@email.unc.edu, (Department of Sociology, CB 3210, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

Neal Caren, neal.caren@unc.edu; (Department of Sociology, CB 3210, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

Elizabeth Borland, borland@tcnj.edu, (Social Sciences Building 317, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Rd., Ewing, NJ 08628)

Daniel Schlozman, daniel.schlozman@jhu.edu, (Johns Hopkins University, Mergenthaler Hall 278, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218)

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Dissertation Award

Any doctoral dissertation completed (i.e. successfully submitted, defended, and approved) in calendar year 2016 is eligible. Only nominations from the student’s dissertation chair or co-chair will be accepted. Nomination letters should not exceed two typed pages in length. The nomination letter should be accompanied by the dissertation in electronic form. Please direct all questions to the committee chair. $1,000 will be awarded. Send a copy of the nomination letter and dissertation to each of the committee members by March 1, 2017:

 

Outstanding Dissertation Award:

Lyndi Hewitt (Chair), lhewitt@unca.edu

Joshua Bloom, joshuabloom@pitt.edu

Daniel Escher, danielescher@gmail.com

Application Deadline for Young Scholars Conference, January 10!

Event hosted by the Center for the Study of Social Movements, University of Notre Dame March 31, 2017.

In conjunction with the presentation of the John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship in Social Movements, The Center for the Study of Social Movements at Notre Dame will be hosting the eighth annual “Young Scholars” Conference the day before the McCarthy Award events. The recipient of the McCarthy Award, David Meyer, will be in attendance and other senior scholars visiting Notre Dame for the award presentation will serve as discussants for the conference.

We would like to invite 12 advanced graduate students and early-career faculty to present a work solidly in-progress at the conference, enjoy an opportunity to discuss their work with some of the leading scholars in the field, and meet others in the new cohort of social movement scholars. Conference attendees will also be invited to the McCarthy Award Lecture and the award banquet on April 1, 2017. The Center will pay for meals, up to three nights lodging, and contribute up to $500 toward travel expenses for each of the conference attendees.

The Center will select invitees from all nominations received by January 10, 2017. Nominations will be accepted for ABD graduate students and those who have held their Ph.D.s less than two years. Nominations must be written by the nominee’s faculty dissertation advisor (or a suitable substitute intimately familiar with the nominee’s research, if the advisor is unavailable). Nominations should include:

A letter of nomination.
2. The CV of the nominee.
3. A one-page abstract of the work to be presented.

Nominations should be sent via email to Rory McVeigh, Director of the Center for the Study of Social Movements, rmcveigh@nd.edu.

2017 McCarthy Award Winner!

The Center for the Study of Social Movements at the University of Notre Dame is very pleased to announce that the winner of the 2017 John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship of Social Movements and Collective Behavior is David Meyer of the University of California at Irvine. The award not only recognizes David’s extraordinary achievements in research, but also the role that he has played in mentoring successive generations of scholars.

David has authored or edited six books and published well over 100 articles, book reviews, and reports that have shaped our thinking about social movements and contentious politics for several decades.   Those who nominated him for the award also emphasized his tireless work as a conscientious mentor. Indeed, a group of his current and former students praised him for the attention he has given to their developing work while also characterizing him as a “constant cheerleader” who is “fully invested in supporting young scholars.”

This year’s award ceremony will be held on April 1, 2017 on the Notre Dame campus. David will be giving a public lecture prior to the award banquet. At the banquet, several of his friends, colleagues and former students will be on hand to offer reflections on his work and influence on the field.

In conjunction with the presentation of the McCarthy Award, the Center for the Study of Social Movements will also be hosting the eight annual Young Scholars in Social Movements Conference on March 31, 2017. Advanced graduate students and recently minted PhD’s will be invited to present their work and receive feedback from the McCarthy Award winner and a distinguished panel of senior scholars in the field. A call for nominations for the Young Scholars Conference will be issued in a separate announcement.

We hope that many of you will mark your calendars and plan to join us for these events. Please be on the lookout for more information in the coming days and weeks—including instructions on how to apply for the Young Scholars Conference. We will distribute the news on the CBSM listserv and also post the news on our Center’s website http://nd.edu/~cssm/

CFP: Diversity and Social Justice in Higher Education

Call for Submissions

Spring 2017 Special Issue: Diversity and Social Justice in Higher Education

This special issue of the Humboldt Journal of Social Relations (HJSR) captures work and experiences in higher education as they relate to changes and challenges around diversifying U.S. college campuses. Race, class, gender, sexuality, able-bodiedness and citizenship shape contemporary conversations about campus climate, curricular content, organizational structures, decision making and the disparate impacts of related policy changes or stagnation. These conversations shape the everyday experiences of faculty and staff, and are ultimately linked to student success.

Submissions are due on October 31, 2016.

Manuscript Submission instructions, and more information, available at the HJSR web site.http://www.humboldt.edu/hjsr/

Authorship: All authors are encouraged to collaborate with others inside or outside academia. Interdisciplinary submissions are welcome.

Co-Editors:

Meredith Conover-Williams, Ph.D., Department of Sociology, Humboldt State University

Joshua S. Smith, Department of Sociology, Humboldt State University

Managing Editors:

Jennifer Miles and Heather Clark, Department of Sociology, Humboldt State University

The Humboldt Journal of Social Relations (HJSR) is a peer reviewed free online journal housed in the Department of Sociology at Humboldt State University. This internationally recognized journal produces annual themed spring editions around current issues and topics. While the articles primarily draw authors from the social sciences, we have also facilitated interdisciplinary collaborations among authors from the arts, humanities, natural sciences & the social sciences. For more information about HJSR, see the journal web site: http://www.humboldt.edu/hjsr/

CFP: Foodways and Inequality: Toward a Sociology of Food Culture and Movements

Call for Papers
Humanity & Society Special
Issue: “Foodways and Inequality: Toward a Sociology of Food Culture and Movements”
Guest Editors: Kaitland M. Byrd (Virginia Tech) and W. Carson Byrd (University of Louisville)

Foodways exist as key sources of cultural capital, and the rising quest for distinction within foodways has led to the proliferation of restaurants and chefs claiming authenticity (Johnson and Baumann 2010). Although the cultural dimension of foodways dominates the literature there is also extensive research on the prevalence of hunger and obesity throughout the United States (Poppendieck 1999, 2011). While a definition of foodways can vary between scholars and academic disciplines, we define foodways as the choices and meanings behind what people eat. Using this conceptualization we can gain a better understanding of how sociological perspectives can elucidate connections between people and food such as the formation of varying food movements, differing forms of inequality, the politics that infiltrate foodways and craft the connection between what people eat, and how people identify themselves through the consumption of specific foodways and food products (e.g., southern barbeque). The sociological study of foodways provides insight into broader processes such as how inequality functions around social movements, the connection between identity, memory, and consumption, and the politics behind the production and consumption of cultural products fundamental for survival. While a multitude of studies have examined the role of foodways in creating cultural distinctions and exploring the increasing problem of hunger, there is a lack of research focusing on the sociological implications of foodways and food movements. The extant focus on food insecurity and elite consumption is too narrow of a lens of social inequality – leaving a large portion of society unexamined. This special issue seeks to remedy this scenario.

The underlying goal of this proposed issue is to highlight research on foodways and inequality grounded in sociological theories emphasizing the breadth of food as an important facet of everyday life across multiple research areas. The scholarship we will include examine various relationships among foodways, food movements, and social inequality. These areas will include, but are not limited to the following areas of research:

  • Social inequality in/and food movements
  • The effects of food movements on local/global foodways
  • Comparisons of the prevalence of food movements across place, gender, and race
  • Comparative research on how alternative foodways (e.g. Indigenous) negotiate external pressures from food movements and initiatives
  • Farming efforts to preserve non-GMO seeds and farming practices
  • Theoretical contributions to understanding foodways and food movements sociologically
  • Comparative research on food movements as social movements both locally and globally
  • Farmer’s markets as sites of alternative food movements and perpetuating sites of inequality
  • Identity politics and food

Please submit abstracts (preferably as Microsoft Word documents), no longer than 500 words, to Kaitland M. Byrd (kmp009@vt.edu) or W. Carson Byrd (wcarson.byrd@louisville.edu) by August 1, 2016. Contributors should note that this call is open and competitive. Additionally, submitted papers must be based on original material not under consideration by any other journal or publication outlet. Authors will be notified of the editors’ decisions no later than September 1, 2016. Papers accepted for further consideration for inclusion in this special issue will go through the same review process as normal journal submissions. The invited papers will be due to the editors by November 1, 2016.

Critical Mass — Spring 2016

PDF version of Critical Mass — Spring 2016

Call for Abstracts: Rethinking Working Class Self-Organization Beyond Unions, Parties, NGOs, and the State

Call for Abstracts: Rethinking Working Class Self-Organization Beyond Unions, Parties, NGOs, and the State

IMMANUEL NESS, Brooklyn College CUNY, USA, manny.ness@gmail.com
ROBERT OVETZ, SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY, USA, rfovetz@riseup.net

The Journal of Labor & Society, in it’s 21st year, is issuing a call for
the special issue “Workers Beyond Unions, Parties, NGOs, and the State?”
to rethink how workers organize and struggle. Co-edited by Robert Ovetz,
Ph.D., a political science lecturer San Jose State University, and
Gifford Hartman, an independent San Francisco, USA based scholar, the
issue seeks submissions from scholars, organizers, and activists
critically reexamining the multiplicity of forms of class struggle
outside of and inside unions, parties, NGOs, and the state happening
around the world.

The rapidly declining power and influence of unions are source of great
concern. Their coninuous decline have presented both a threat and an
opportunity. As the number of contingent workers explodes and union
density worldwide remains stagnant or declines, the effort of workers to
self-organize continues to grow. The absence or weakness of unions does
not mean the absence of class struggle. Freed of the contract, workers
are engaging in short, sharp disruptive direct action and strikes to
shift the balance of power on the shopfloor and in the community. But
these actions are often ad hoc, locally focused and unsustainable.
Despite these limitations, workers are finding new ways to self-organize
on the shopfloor and circulate their efforts throughout the social
factory. The composition of capital’s power over the past 40 years has
been a continual effort to respond to the dynamic recomposition of
working class struggle.

This issue would explore what working class recomposition looks like by
examining case studies of efforts to devise new tactics and strategies of
self-organization. Ideally, this issue will include critical analyses of
a diversity of self-organized workers struggles from several critical
regions. Among the struggles that could be potentially covered would be
the following:

Brazilian Landless Workers Movement’s efforts to seize land and build a
parallel social system
Spainish workers blocking evictions and foreclosures
Mexican workers seizure of an entire neighborhood to reorganization of
it into an autonomous community
Bolivian miners, coca growers, and street sellers in El Alto who formed
community councils that shut down the entire country in the early 2000s
and propelled the MAS into power
Latin American women struggling over the Bolsa Família social wage in
Brazil, Bolivia, and Venezuela
Industrial workers and miners in India, China, and South Africa who
bypass established unions to self-organize their own wildcat strikes
Kurdish workers self-organized local governance and militias in Rojava,
Syria during the civil war
Wildcat strikes in Egypt during the Arab Spring
Union backed service workers in the US who have been organizing to
disrupt production, protest contingency, and raise wages without seeking
to collectively bargain
Wildcat strikes by logistics workers (eg, truckers, longshore,
warehouse, etc.) and public employees
European anti-austerity movements

Why This Issue is Important

The focus of this issue of the Journal of Labor & Society will be on
worker organizing beyond unions, parties and NGOs that channel and
constrain organizing over the “contract” and into the state through
advocacy, elections and reform. These examples above are rich with
several vital lessons for worker self-organization we wish to see
explored in this issue. First, workers are contesting the organizational
dominance of unions by bypassing and challenging the traditional model
of unions limited to bargaining over wages, hours, grievances, working
conditions, and labor law. Second, these struggles are also transcending
parties, NGOs, and the state at a time of growing widespread resistance
to the imposition of neo-liberal policy by labor, social democratic and
left leaning parties backed by NGOs, unions, and ruling elites in Europe
and Latin America. Such institutions divert conflict by harnessing
workers to the state and capitalism thus diluting the power of
self-organized workers. (S. Marcos, R. Zibechi, M. Glaberman, G. Esteva,
and G. Rawick)

Drawing on the autonomous marxist, anarchist, and syndicalist critiques
of unions and the self-organization of workers (V. Burgmann, S. Lynd, H.
Cleaver, and P. Linebaugh) this issue would explore how workers are
devising new forms of organizing to confront capital at work and
throughout the social factory (S. Federici, S. James, M. Dalla Costa,
and M. Tronti) signaling a turning point in what it means to organize a
“union.”

The debate over whether unions should follow the “service” or “member
organizing” model or through parties, NGOs or the state is moot. Workers
are transforming their organizing into a global uprising that continues
to disrupt the global accumulation and circulation of capital by
transforming the struggle over work into a struggle to circulate class
power into all spheres of life. As capital seeks to colonize all aspects
of life so has working class struggle expanded to meet this threat. The
question this issue seeks to explore is what is the form of the
currently emerging recomposition of working class power?

Publication Plans
After the solicitation of abstracts we will invite full manuscripts for
publication in the June 2017 issue of the Journal of Labor & Society.
Abstracts (maximum 500 words, attached as .pdf or .docx files) due by
August 1, 2016
Invitation to submit full manuscript will be sent August 21, 2016
Manuscripts (5,000-7,500) due February 21, 2017
Special issue of the Journal of Labor & Society will be published in
June 2017

Call For Papers: The Precariat & The Professor

In the past 25 years, higher education has seen some major transformations. The percentage of college students who are Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black, and Native American has increased steadily while the percentage of white students declines. Unfortunately, increased enrollment and newfound visibility does not necessarily translate into a seat at the table. University administration and faculty do not reflect the demographic shifts seen in student populations. In 2013, 84 percent of full-time professors were white, and 53% white male. At the same time, tuitions continue to rise, but rarely do those funds trickle down to the classroom. More money is being funneled into administrative positions and away from tenure-line hires. Most teaching positions are now part-time and low-paid adjunct positions. According to a 2012 report from the American Association of University Professors, contingent faculty make up over 75% of all instructional staffing. In 1975 only 25% were in these positions.

The most active individuals addressing these institutional shifts, are the contingent faculty members themselves. Unfortunately, their marginalized positions limit their ability to participate in campus governance. In addition, the culture of insularity and individualism challenges any attempts at solidarity building and delegitimizes the experiences of the precariat when they take their concerns out into the public sphere. Their work, their experiences, and their contributions to scholarship and teaching are often dismissed, mislabeled, misunderstood, or entirely ignored.

The Precariat and The Professor addresses common misconceptions and will serve as a valuable resource for anyone trying to understand the effects of recent transformations in higher education. In order to address the many false premises and beliefs currently circulating about contingent faculty, we welcome submissions from all those affected by the reliance of precious labor in higher education, and especially welcome the work of students and the contingent. We anticipate that the volume will attract a wide readership. It will speak to scholars, activists, parents, students, teachers and laypeople interested in higher education, pedagogy, activism, identity politics, and advocacy.

Committed to presenting a body of work that recognizes the fullest possible range of experiences, The Precariat and The Professor encourages traditional scholarly submissions (historical, demographic, and sociological), as well as more interdisciplinary, creative, and self-reflective contributions. Moreover, we want to look to the future. Can we envision positive change? Is there a way to “fix” the issue of contingency? How can faculty off the tenure-track transition to other jobs that recognize and utilize their talents? What is the role of the public intellectual, and what relationship does that have with precarious faculty? Can we envision a path towards transformation and revolutionary solidarity?

Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • The history of labor and unions in the academy
  • Contingency and the tenure process
  • Interactions between contingent faculty and graduate and undergraduate students
  • Personal memoir and creative writing (short fiction, poetry, flash fiction, creative non-fiction) by and about adjunct or contingent faculty experiences
  • Affect and the neoliberal university
  • Landscapes of power and privilege on campus and in the classroom
  • Organizing, activism, and labor unions
  • Gender, race, and class (or other intersectional perspectives) while contingent
  • Mythologies and ideologies of success, tenure, and advancement
  • Collegiality and departmental politics

The manuscript will be divided into three roughly sketched sections:

  1. The Teacher: Ways that contingency shapes, or changes, your experiences as a classroom teacher. This can broadly cover the literal experience of being inside the classroom space; the experience of working on multiple campuses; teaching online, or hybrid teaching; or the way classroom teaching as contingent faculty shapes, or changes, your day to day life.
  2. The Scholar: The ways that contingency affects scholarship, i.e., being “othered” by the academy, and lacking real institutional support, both fiscally and logistically, or ways outsider status allows for views and scholarly work not traditionally held or practiced by academics.
  3. The Human: Effects of contingency on one’s personal life. Includes but is not limited to finances, mental, physical, and emotional health, family life, professional relationships, and relationship with scholarly or creative work.

Submitted contributions may include full-length academic essays (about 5000 – 7000 words), shorter creative pieces, cultural commentaries, or personal narratives (about 500 – 2500 words), poetry, and photo-essays.

300-word abstract/proposals are due 7/1.

Submit proposals, inquiries, or questions to the editors:

Jillian Powers: jpowers03@gmail.com
Emily Van Duyne: emily.vanduyne@stockton.edu

We look forward to your submissions.

In Solidarity,

J&E

Original CfP: https://theprecariatandtheprofessor.wordpress.com/

CFP: Sociopedia.isa

Call for papers

Sociopedia.isa is an online peer-reviewed journal that publishes state-of-the-art review articles in the social sciences. The journal was founded in 2010 as a joint venture of the International Sociological Association (ISA) and SAGE. Since then, Sociopedia.isa has published more than sixty entries on a variety of topics. Every year the 8-10 best entries of Sociopedia.isa are selected for inclusion in an annual Review Issue of Current Sociology, one of the two flagship journals of the ISA.

We invite scholars to submit their review entries on any subject in the social sciences. Articles should give an overview of theoretical approaches on the subject, review existing empirical evidence, provide an assessment of the research to date and end with a discussion on the future direction(s). Entries are written in English and should not exceed 7000 words. For PhD students, Sociopedia.isa provides an ideal opportunity to turn the theoretical chapter of their dissertation into a journal article.

Once submitted, review entries are subject to a thorough peer review process. After acceptance, entries are published quickly. As entries can be commented on, and scholars are requested to update their entry every few years, Sociopedia.isa offers ‘living social science’.

The published entries of Sociopedia.isa are freely accessible online. Please visit our website: http://www.isa-sociology.org/publ/sociopedia-isa/. Sociopedia.isa is now also on Twitter!

https://twitter.com/Sociopedia_isa

If you have any questions, or would like to submit a paper, please contact the editorial office at sociopedia.isa.fsw@vu.nl

Kind regards,

Bert Klandermans, Editor in Chief

Teodora Gaidyte, Editorial Assistant

Sociopedia.isa, Faculty of Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV
Amsterdam, the Netherlands