New Book: The Palgrave Handbook of Social Movements, Revolution, and Social Transformation

See: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319923536

Just published Palgrave, edited by Berch Berberoglu, this handbook addresses some of the key issues related to the nature and dynamics of social movements and revolutions as the basis for the transformation of society. It provides the latest research and analysis on a variety of social movements on a global scale, with focus on major social movements and revolutions of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

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Call for Papers: Seattle+20, Movements at the Millennium

Special Issue of the journal, Socialism and Democracy

Summary. Twenty years after the so-called “Battle in Seattle” and the millennial turn, we seek papers that help explain the 1990s-2010s period of struggle in the United States. In particular we are interested in accounts and analyses of the popular movements of this period and the different frameworks informing these mobilizations. Socialism and Democracy is a peer reviewed academic and practice-based journal that brings together the worlds of scholarship and activism, theory and practice, to examine in depth the core issues and popular movements of our time. Abstracts for this issue are due March 15th and full manuscripts are due May 1st of 2019; please see “How to Submit,” below, for details.

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Fall 2018 issue of Critical Mass Now Online!

The Fall 2018 issue of CriticalMass is now online! Contents include:

Message from the Chair
Fandom as a Method of Social Movement Recruitment
Abortion Online: How Non-Partisan Media Still Builds a Polarized Internet
Trolls in #ShoutYourAbortion
Women March Across the Globe
Section Notes: The Impact of the Mentoring Program
Section Notes: Mentoring Committee Update
ASA 2018: Non-State Opposition to and Suppression of Social Movements
ASA 2018: Revisiting Threats and Grievances in the Trump Era
ASA 2018: Methodological Advances in Social Movements
Recent Publications
CBSM Awards 2018
Calls for Papers & Other Opportunities

43-2 Critical Mass Bulletin – Fall 2018

43-2 References – Fall 2018

Critical Mass: Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 issue of Critical Mass is now live!

43 – 1 Critical Mass Bulletin Spring 2018 [Final]

In this issue:

Message from the Chair
The Future of #Resistance
Candlelight Protests in South KoreaProgressive Religion and the Women’s March on Chicago
Virginia Indivisible Local Groups
Recent Publications
Art of the March: International Women’s March Sign Archive
CBSM-Related Events at ASA 2018

Critical Mass: Fall 2017

The Fall 2017 issue of Critical Mass is now available online:

42-2 Critical Mass Bulletin – Fall 2017

In This Issue
Message from the Chair
In Memoriam: Greg Maney
Why Can’t We All Just Get Along? Factionalism in Animal Rights
Memory Activism: Reimagining the past for Future Activism in Israel
ASA 2017: Leadership, Strategy, and Organization in Social Movements
ASA 2017: Consequences of Social Movements
Recent Publications
CBSM Awards 2017
Calls for Papers & Other Opportunities

Addressing intersectionality: social movements and the politics of inclusivity

Workshop organizers: Elizabeth Evans, Goldsmiths, University of London, Ilana Eloit, London School of Economicsn and Eléonore Lépinard, University of Lausanne

Eleonore.Lepinard@unil.ch , Elizabeth.evans@gold.ac.uk , i.m.eloit@lse.ac.uk

All papers for our workshop must be submitted via MyECPR:

https://ecpr.eu/Login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fEvents%2fEventDetails.aspx%3fEventID%3d112

We will not be able to approve any papers that are submitted directly to us, as they will need to be in the system.  Feel free to contact us if you have any queries.

For submission guidelines and further instructions, please visit the ECPR website:

https://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=112

The deadline for paper proposals is Wednesday 6th December.

Workshop outline:

Social movements play a critical role in local, national and international politics, mobilising a range of diverse groups and interests. Exploring who is included and who is excluded within these movements is a critical project. It is a task that requires an intersectional lens to examine how multiple and overlapping points of oppression shape power dynamics within social movements. Such an approach, enables scholars to identify the challenges that a lack of heterogeneity poses to the legitimacy, accountability and representational functions of social movement politics.

With historical and theoretical roots in Black feminism and women of color activism, intersectionality is a concept forged to address concerns relating to inclusivity and representation in social movement (Davis 1981, hooks 1981, Moraga and Anzaldúa 1981, Lorde 1984, Crenshaw 1989).  More than four decades later, acknowledging diversity, inequalities invisibilities, as well as desires to “organize on one’s own” (Roth 2004) amongst political activists has become increasingly important to gender and politics, LGBTQI+ politics, and race and politics scholars; many of whom argue that identifying and analyzing power dynamics between and amongst different identity groups is critical to exploring issues of access and inclusion within civil society movements (e.g. Crenshaw 1991, Strolovitch 2008, Springer 2005).

However, this call for an intersectional perspective on social movement’s discourses, practices and politics of alliances and conflicts is far from being systematically adopted by social movements scholars. Whilst intersectionality has constituted a paradigm shift in gender studies (Hancock, 2007), and has become increasingly important for scholars of race and ethnicity as well as LGBTQI politics (Kearl, 2015), it is not clear whether those active within other types of social movement, or those studying them, also take account of difference and the interactive effects of identity markers and structural inequalities. While research exploring intersectionality and social movements will necessarily appeal to scholars of women’s, civil rights, labor unions, migrant rights and LGBTQI+ movements; issues of inclusion, accessibility and accountability are critical for all of those working on social movement studies.

The purpose of this workshop is to develop a new research network that is dedicated to exploring the conceptual, empirical and methodological challenges and opportunities that applying an intersectional framework offers to scholars of social movement studies who are looking to apply it to new areas. Hence, this research network will bring together those working on empirical and theoretical studies that examine a range of different social movements, in order to develop new ways of thinking about, and applying, intersectionality. Read More

Call for Award Nominations 2017

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Student Paper Award

Anyone without a PhD in 2016 is considered a student, and any paper (published or unpublished) written in 2016 by a student or students (i.e., no PhD coauthors) is eligible.  A previously submitted paper may be resubmitted only if significantly revised.  Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members. No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  $500 will be awarded.  Send a copy of the paper electronically to each of the committee members by March 1, 2017.

 

Mayer Zald Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award Committee:  

Jennifer Earl (Chair), jenniferearl@email.arizona.edu

Ziad Munson, munson@lehigh.edu

Lee Ann Banaszak, lab14@psu.edu

Marcos Perez, meperez@colby.edu

Han Zhang, hz2@Princeton.EDU

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Article Award

Articles and chapters from edited books with publication dates of 2016 are eligible. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send a copy of the article electronically to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2017:

 

Best Published Article Award Committee:

Belinda Robnett (Chair), brobnett@uci.edu

John Krinsky, jkrinsky.ccny@gmail.com

Edward Walker, walker@soc.ucla.edu

Bogdan Vasi, ion-vasi@uiowa.edu

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award

Section members, authors, or publishers may nominate books with publication dates of 2016. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members or publishers.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send or have publishers send a copy of the book to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2017:

 

Charles Tilly Award for Best Book Committee: 

Kenneth (Andy) Andrews, (Chair), kta1@email.unc.edu, (Department of Sociology, CB 3210, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

Neal Caren, neal.caren@unc.edu; (Department of Sociology, CB 3210, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599)

Elizabeth Borland, borland@tcnj.edu, (Social Sciences Building 317, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Rd., Ewing, NJ 08628)

Daniel Schlozman, daniel.schlozman@jhu.edu, (Johns Hopkins University, Mergenthaler Hall 278, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218)

 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Dissertation Award

Any doctoral dissertation completed (i.e. successfully submitted, defended, and approved) in calendar year 2016 is eligible. Only nominations from the student’s dissertation chair or co-chair will be accepted. Nomination letters should not exceed two typed pages in length. The nomination letter should be accompanied by the dissertation in electronic form. Please direct all questions to the committee chair. $1,000 will be awarded. Send a copy of the nomination letter and dissertation to each of the committee members by March 1, 2017:

 

Outstanding Dissertation Award:

Lyndi Hewitt (Chair), lhewitt@unca.edu

Joshua Bloom, joshuabloom@pitt.edu

Daniel Escher, danielescher@gmail.com