Calls for Award Nominations

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Student Paper Award

Anyone without a PhD in 2015 is considered a student, and any paper (published or unpublished) written in 2015 by a student or students (i.e., no PhD coauthors) is eligible.  A previously submitted paper may be resubmitted only if significantly revised.  Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members. No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  This award includes a $500 prize.  Send a copy of the paper electronically to each of the committee members by March 1, 2016:

Mayer Zald Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award:  Kenneth Andrews (chair), kta1@email.unc.edu; Drew Halfmann, dhalfmann@ucdavis.edu; Catherine Corrigall-Brown, corrigall.brown@ubc.ca ; Robert Braun, rb529@cornell.edu.

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Article Award

Articles and chapters from edited books with publication dates of 2015 are eligible. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send a copy of the article electronically to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2016:

Best Published Article Award James M. Jasper (chair), jjasper@gc.cuny.edu; Neal Caren, neal.caren@unc.edu; Elizabeth Borland, Borland@tcnj.edu; Justin Farrell, justin.farrell@yale.edu 

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award

Section members, authors, or publishers may nominate books with publication dates of 2015. Authors may submit their own work, or nominations may be made by section members or publishers.  No lengthy nominating letters please, and please send all questions to the committee chair.  Send or have publishers send a copy of the book to each member of the prize committee by March 1, 2016:

Charles Tilly Award for Best Book:  Belinda Robnett (Chair) brobnett@uci.edu, (University of California, School of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, 3151 Social Science Plaza, Irvine, CA. 92697-5100); Lee Ann Banaszak,lab14@psu.edu, (Department of Political Science, Pennsylvania State University, 31 Pond Lab, University Park, PA 16802); Edward Walker, walker@soc.ucla.edu, (Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 228A Haines Hall, Los Angeles, CA. 90095); Katrina Kimport, katrina.kimport@ucsf.edu, (UCSF-ANSIRH, 1330 Broadway, Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612)

Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Dissertation Award

Any doctoral dissertation completed (i.e. successfully submitted, defended, and approved) in calendar year 2015 is eligible. Only nominations from the student’s dissertation chair or co-chair will be accepted. Nomination letters should not exceed two typed pages in length. The nomination letter should be accompanied by the dissertation in electronic form. Please direct all questions to the committee chair. This award includes a $1,000 prize. Send a copy of the nomination letter and dissertation to each of the committee members by March 1, 2016:

Outstanding Dissertation Award: Wayne Santoro (Chair), wsantoro@unm.edu; Tanya Saunders, saunders.425.osu.edu; Steven Boutcher, boutcher@soc.umass.edu; Melissa Wooten, mwooten@soc.umass.edu

PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL NOMINEES MUST BE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE ASA
TO BE CONSIDERED FOR SECTION AWARDS

 

Call for Papers — Law, Social Movements, and Mobilization Across Contexts

Law & Policy, a peer-reviewed journal published by Wiley, is seeking submissions for a special issue entitled Law, Social Movements, and Mobilization Across Contexts, edited by Steven Boutcher (UMass Amherst) and Lynette J. Chua (National University of Singapore). Submitted papers should advance theory on the relationship between legal mobilization and social movements. We take a broad approach toward legal mobilization to include not only litigation but also the use of law in lobbying, policy-making and implementation, and other types of advocacy work. We also construe “contexts” widely to refer to domestic, international, transnational, or other socio-political locales, time periods, or institutional settings, such as courts, legislature, and agencies. The submissions need not be explicitly comparative, though we especially welcome work that is comparative across contexts (as we have broadly construed).

Submission Guidelines:

To be considered for inclusion, please submit an abstract of a maximum of 1,000 words that clearly outlines the theoretical approach, empirical material, research methods, and any preliminary findings. Please send your abstract to both editors (email addresses below) using the following file title: “Your Name_Law and Social Movements.pdf” no later than October 15, 2015. Authors selected for the special issue will be notified by early December and will then be asked to submit full versions of the paper, between 8,000 and 10,000 words, by mid-March for peer review. We will consider longer submissions with sufficient justification, but submissions cannot exceed 12,500 words. All selected submissions will go through a double-blind review process.

Abstracts and inquiries should be sent to:

Steven Boutcher
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
boutcher@soc.umass.edu

Lynette J. Chua
National University of Singapore
lynettechua@nus.edu.sg

About the Journal:

Law & Policy is a fully peer-reviewed journal that is international and interdisciplinary in scope. It embraces varied research methodologies that interrogate law, governance, and public policy worldwide and contributes to current dialogue on contemporary policy in areas such as government and self-regulation, health, environment, family, gender, taxation and finance, legal decision-making, criminal justice, and human rights.

ISA Forum Session CfP: Youth and Climate Change

Session Title: Youth and Climate Change

Organizer: Jeylan T. Mortimer, University of Minnesota

ISA Forum, Vienna, July 10-14, 2016

Climate scientists predict that intensifying planetary warming will cause more frequent severe weather events, droughts and water shortages. These will likely cause massive population migrations and wars over declining resources. Youth are often the most able and willing to migrate, and they become the soldiers in war, voluntarily or not. Such changes may disrupt the passage to adulthood, especially in the global South, as migrant youth experience difficulties in assimilating into new societies. Many youth may find it difficult to see ahead, to envision stable life courses for themselves and future generations. Failure of governments to act may foster a decline in confidence in, and disconnection from, societal institutions.

This session will draw attention to the challenges and potentially catastrophic consequences posed by climate change for present and future youth generations and encourage research on this topic. Illustrative questions to be considered: How have recent severe weather events impacted youth? Are youth becoming aware of the threat of climate change? How is it affecting their outlooks to the future? Are value shifts occurring among young people as it becomes increasingly evident that the planet’s capacity to support life is eroding—e.g., values surrounding economic growth, population size, energy conservation, life styles and living arrangements? Are youth becoming attracted to social movements advocating governmental and individual ameliorative action, or are they increasingly acknowledging dystopian futures, assuming a fatalistic stance, and turning inward? To what extent are youth spearheading social movements to address climate change?

Abstract submission portal: http://www.isa-sociology.org/forum-2016/

Sponsored by RC34, Research Committee on Youth

Deadline: September 30, 2015.

Call for Papers: Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change v. 40

Call for Papers

Narratives of Identity in Social Movements, Conflicts & Change

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts & Change, Volume 40

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change, a peer-reviewed volume published by Emerald Group Publishing, encourages submissions for Volume 40 of the series.

This volume will include research in two areas: (1) submissions focused on analytical analyses of identity and narratives of identity in conflict outbreaks, dynamics, resolution and/or post-conflict peacebuilding and transitional justice; and (2) general submissions appropriate to any of the three broad foci reflected in the Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change series title. The Volume Editor is Landon E. Hancock (Kent State University). Submissions may focus on single or comparative case studies or may explore other avenues of analysis, but all submissions should be data-driven and theoretically informed.

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change (RSMCC) is a fully peer-reviewed series of original research that has been published at least annually for over 35 years. We continue to publish the work of many of the leading scholars in social movements, social change, and peace and conflict studies. Although RSMCC enjoys a wide library subscription base for the book versions, all volumes are also published both in book form and are available online to subscribing libraries through Emerald Insight. This ensures wider distribution and easier online access to your scholarship while maintaining the esteemed book series at the same time.

RSMCC boasts quick turn-around times, generally communicating peer reviewed-informed decisions within 10-12 weeks of receipt of submissions.

Submission guidelines

To be considered for inclusion in Volume 40, papers should arrive by September 15, 2015, earlier submissions are welcomed as well. Queries about possible submissions are also welcomed by the Volume Editor in advance of the submission due date.

Send submissions as a WORD document attached to an email with the subject line “RSMCC” to Landon Hancock, guest RSMCC editor for volume 40 at: lhancoc2@kent.edu

  • Except for on the title page (which should include full contact information for all authors) remove all self-references (in text and in bibliography).
  • Include the paper’s title and the unstructured abstract on the first page of the text itself.
  • Provide 5-6 key words below the abstract
  • For initial submissions, any standard social science in-text citation and bibliographic system is acceptable.

For more information, please visit the RSMCC website: www.emeraldinsight.com/series/rsmcc

Please forward and distribute this call widely.

Nominations — Penn State Democracy Medal

Each year, the Pennsylvania State University McCourtney Institute for Democracy gives a medal and $5,000 award for exceptional innovations that advance the design and practice of democracy. The medal celebrates and helps to publicize the best work being done by individuals or organizations to advance democracy in the United States or around the globe. The Institute gives medals in even-numbered years to recognize practical innovations, such as new institutions, laws, technologies, or movements that advance democracy. In odd-numbered years, the awards celebrate advances in democratic theory that provide richer philosophical or empirical conceptions of democracy. The Participatory Budgeting Project won the first medal in 2014 for the best innovation in the practice of democracy (see details at democracyinstitute.la.psu.edu).

Nominations will be accepted through December 10, 2014, and the awardee will be announced in the spring of 2015. The winning individual (or representative of a winning organization) will give a talk at Penn State in the fall of 2015, when they also receive their medal and $5,000 award. Between the spring announcement of the winner and the on-campus event in the fall, the Institute provides the recipient with professional editorial assistance toward completing a short (20-25 pages) essay describing the innovation for a general audience. Cornell University Press will publish the essay, which will be available to the general public at a very low price in electronic and print formats to aid the diffusion of the winning innovation.

Read More

CfP, “Social Movements and Place-Making in Global Cities,” Urban Affairs Association Annual Meeting, Miami, FL, April 8-11, 2015

In recent years, Occupy protests, the Indignados of Spain, and the Arab Spring uprisings have demonstrated that space, place, and territoriality matter for social movements. These movements drew much scholarly attention to the politics of place-making, highlighting the ways in which the intricacies of place shape and are shaped by social movement action. This call for panelists seeks papers that engage with questions related to place-making—the construction of place as material, symbolic and/or practical—by social movements around the world. How do social movement places affect urban landscapes? How do the spatial dynamics of urban social movements affect what those movements do? How can place-making processes effect social change in cities around the globe? How do the processes of globalization affect social movement efforts at place-making? For many contemporary social movements, the future appears uncertain and the possibilities for social change are shrinking, given the ever-increasing rules and regulations that characterize urban public life. Place-making can be crucial for enabling movement activities to grow, and develop. However, place-making is not only a means to an end, but an important process in its own right. By bringing place-making to the center of social movement analysis, this panel will raise important questions and debates about the relationship between place and social change in urban contexts.

Please send your name, affiliation, and abstract (300 words or less) to Kimberly Creasap (kac130@pitt.edu) by September 1, 2014.

*Full details on the UAA meeting can be found at: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/2015_call1.pdf

CfP, Mobilization Special Issue on Nonviolent Civil Resistance—Sharon Erickson Nepstad.

Sharon Erickson Nepstad will be guest editing a special issue of Mobilization, focusing on the theme of nonviolent civil resistance.  Mobilization is a leading international peer-reviewed journal of research about social and political movements, strikes, riots, protests, insurgencies, revolutions, and other forms of contentious politics. Its goal is to advance the systematic, scholarly, and scientific study of these phenomena, and to provide a forum for the discussion of methodologies, theories, and conceptual approaches across the disciplines. For this special issue, we encourage submissions on topics such as variations of nonviolent strategies across divergent political contexts and against diverse targets, the effects of repression on nonviolent movements, factors shaping the outcome of civil resistance struggles, tactical choices and shifts between armed and unarmed forms of struggle, how civil resistance affects conflict dynamics, long-term consequences of violent versus nonviolent struggle, and the international diffusion of nonviolent methods.  All submissions should be sent to Sharon Erickson Nepstad, guest editor, at nepstad@unm.edu. Submission deadline for this special issue is November 1, 2014.

Submissions should include the following: 1) a title page, containing full contact information for all authors; 2) an abstract of approximately 150 words; and 3) the manuscript (maximum length is 40 double spaced pages, not including tables and references).  Please remove all self-references in the text and in the bibliography.  All manuscripts must be sent as a Word document.  For more information about manuscript formatting and submission, please visit:http://www.mobilization.sdsu.edu/generalinfo/submit.html

New Book Series, Reproductive Justice—Zakiya Luna.

REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: A NEW VISION FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Call for Proposals

The new reproductive justice book series from University of California Press will publish works exploring the contours and content of reproductive justice.  The series will include primers aimed at students or people new to reproductive justice and books of original research.  Authors are invited to submit proposals that will engage activists, academics, and others. The first primer will be, What is Reproductive Justice? by Rickie Solinger and Loretta Ross. We are now accepting submissions for books featuring original research.

The phrase “reproductive justice” was coined in 1994 to describe an intersectional framework drawing attention to how the right to have a child and the right to parent are as important as the right to not have children. In the two decades since, RJ organizations and scholars have pursued a number of projects that pay close attention to the social, political, and environmental context in which sex, pregnancy, and parenthood are regulated.  

The RJ series is interested in original manuscripts that engage reproductive justice within a complex context. Topics could include:
•    abortion
•    assisted reproductive technology 
•    birthing options 
•    coerced obstetrics 
•    criminalization of reproduction 
•    drug use and parenting
•    environmental degradation and infertility 
•    incarcerated people and  reproductive rights 
•    population control 
•    queering family formation
•    youth parenting 

The RJ perspective and movement has provided a contemporary generation of activists and scholars – together with stalwart veterans— new energy.   This is an exciting time to consider the new vision for the 21st century that RJ offers.  The editors of the new series are seeking projects that reflect this vision and new energy.

Proposal Submission Procedures
A complete submission to the RJ book series will include 1) a book proposal of no more than 4,000 words, 2) a CV, and 3) one or two published writing samples. Please refer to the UC Press website for general book proposal elements and procedures. In addition, note that for book proposals for the RJ series the following items should be included: a market considerations section with discussion of pedagogical applications and innovative marketing ideas and an author biography section that describes previous work including, if relevant, connections with reproductive health, rights and justice organizing. We are not requesting manuscript chapters at this time, although additional information may be requested after initial review of submissions.

The RJ series is affiliated with the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. Thus, authors of original texts who secure contracts with the RJ book series will have the opportunity to apply for a Visiting Researcher affiliation with CRRJ that includes access to UCB resources such as writing space and library access that assist in completion of the manuscript. 

The RJ series editors and advisory board will review submissions and may request additional material before recommendation to UC Press editorial review. Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis, but for full consideration in the initial publication cycle, please submit by July 15, 2014. Please email submissions and any questions to all the series editors at rickie@wakeup-arts.com

Series editors:
Rickie Solinger, Historian (Senior Editor)
Khiara M. Bridges, Anthropology and Law, Boston University (Co-editor)
 Zakiya Luna, Sociology, UC Santa Barbara (Co-editor)

 More info on the UCP website (http://www.ucpress.edu/series.php?ser=rjnv)

CfP, Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change—Patrick G. Coy.

Call for Papers–Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change

“Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change,” an annual peer-reviewed volume of research, invites submissions for Volume 38 of the series. This volume will be non-thematic, i.e. submissions appropriate to any of the three broad foci reflected in the Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change (RSMCC) series title will be considered.

RSMCC is a fully peer-reviewed series of original research that has been published annually for over 35 years. We continue to publish the work of many of the leading scholars in social movements, social change, nonviolent action, and peace and conflict studies.
Although RSMCC enjoys a wide library subscription base for the book versions, all volumes are published not only in book form but are also available online through Emerald Social Science eBook Series Collection via subscribing libraries. This ensures wider distribution and easier access to your scholarship while maintaining the book series at the same time.

To be considered for inclusion in Volume 38, papers must arrive by September 7, 2014.  Earlier submissions are especially welcomed. Decisions are generally made within 8-12 weeks.
Send submission as a WORD document attached to an email to Patrick Coy, RSMCC editor, at pcoy@kent.edu. For initial submissions, any standard social science in-text citation and bibliographic system is acceptable. Remove all self-references in the text and in the bibliography. Word counts should generally not exceed 12,000 words, inclusive of supplemental materials (abstract, tables, bibliography, etc.). Include the paper’s title and an unstructured abstract on the first page of the text itself. Send a second file that contains the article title, the unstructured abstract, and full contact information for all authors.

RSMCC Website:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0163-786X

CfP, From Contention to Social Change–Eduardo Romanos.

Call for Papers

ESA Research Network 25 – Social Movements
Mid-term Conference
19-20 February 2015
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

From Contention to Social Change:
Rethinking the Consequences of Social Movements and Cycles of Protests

A considerable amount of recent research has been devoted to the effects of mobilization with the intent of specifying how social movements produce social changes of various sorts. Political outcomes – including the responsiveness of decision-makers – have been studied the most, but scholarly interest in other types of effects is also growing. Among the effects that have drawn the attention of scholars are the changed behavior of economic actors and market institutions (economic effects); opinions, beliefs and collective identities of the movements’ participants and of their audience (cultural impacts); as well as variations in the life-course of individuals who participate in movement activities (biographical consequences). Sometimes these effects are intentional and sometimes not.  In fact, on occasion they are contrary to the aims of those who produce them. Still, it is clear that contentious actions – whether they take the form of small local petitions, large street demonstrations or transnational campaigns mobilized on-line – transcend the internal life of social movements and have an influence on the rest of society.

Despite the abundance of research on these themes, some aspects of the consequences of social movements are still understudied.

First, while the role of the contentiousness of protest actions or the number of mobilized activists has been well-discussed, we know relatively little about how important the content of claims is for achieving movements’ goals. Framing has been shown to play a role in shaping political outcomes in some contexts, but more research could be done in this field. For example, how does the deliberative quality of the arguments made by the movement matter for the mobilization of further (the next wave) protests or for political outcomes?

Second, how does the success or failure of the movement affect the attitudes (e.g., perceived political efficacy and responsiveness) and future mobilization of the activists? There is, in general, little known about the failures and disengagement of social movements, but the consequences of such processes should be particularly noteworthy for those interested in the development of civil society.

Third, how the growing use of on-line media in social movement mobilization affect the consequences of social movements? For instance, does it lead to less sustainable mobilisation and thereby more failures? How does the use of Twitter or Facebook affect the cultural or biographical outcomes?

The mid-term conference of the ESA Research Network on Social Movements will focus on the preceding questions and welcomes both theoretical and empirical papers that tackle these and closely related issues. Single case studies and comparative studies are equally welcome.

Proposals should include the title of the proposed paper, an abstract of up to 300 words, the author’s name and affiliation. All abstracts should be in English.

The deadline for proposals is 30 September 2014 and they should be sent to both of the organizers (see email addresses below). Decisions will be communicated by 31 October. Participants will be asked to submit their papers no later than 19 January 2015.

The conference venue is the Complutense University’s TRANSOC Institute on Social Transformations, which is sited at the Escuela de Relaciones Laborales, in the city centre (San Bernardo 49, Madrid).

The conference organizers cannot pay for travel and accommodation expenses; however, attendance is free of charge and food and beverage will be provided in coffee breaks and lunchtime. Discount rates at hotels close to the conference venue will be available for participants.

For more information: http://socialmovementsconference.wordpress.com

The conference organizers and Research Network chairs are:

Eduardo Romanos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (eromanos@ucm.es)

Katrin Uba, Uppsala University (katrin.uba@statsvet.uu.se)

________________________________

Dr. Eduardo Romanos
Ramón y Cajal Fellow
Department of Sociology I
Universidad Complutense de Madrid