Category Archives: Calls for Papers and Proposals

Call for Papers: Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change v. 40

Call for Papers

Narratives of Identity in Social Movements, Conflicts & Change

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts & Change, Volume 40

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change, a peer-reviewed volume published by Emerald Group Publishing, encourages submissions for Volume 40 of the series.

This volume will include research in two areas: (1) submissions focused on analytical analyses of identity and narratives of identity in conflict outbreaks, dynamics, resolution and/or post-conflict peacebuilding and transitional justice; and (2) general submissions appropriate to any of the three broad foci reflected in the Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change series title. The Volume Editor is Landon E. Hancock (Kent State University). Submissions may focus on single or comparative case studies or may explore other avenues of analysis, but all submissions should be data-driven and theoretically informed.

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change (RSMCC) is a fully peer-reviewed series of original research that has been published at least annually for over 35 years. We continue to publish the work of many of the leading scholars in social movements, social change, and peace and conflict studies. Although RSMCC enjoys a wide library subscription base for the book versions, all volumes are also published both in book form and are available online to subscribing libraries through Emerald Insight. This ensures wider distribution and easier online access to your scholarship while maintaining the esteemed book series at the same time.

RSMCC boasts quick turn-around times, generally communicating peer reviewed-informed decisions within 10-12 weeks of receipt of submissions.

Submission guidelines

To be considered for inclusion in Volume 40, papers should arrive by September 15, 2015, earlier submissions are welcomed as well. Queries about possible submissions are also welcomed by the Volume Editor in advance of the submission due date.

Send submissions as a WORD document attached to an email with the subject line “RSMCC” to Landon Hancock, guest RSMCC editor for volume 40 at: lhancoc2@kent.edu

  • Except for on the title page (which should include full contact information for all authors) remove all self-references (in text and in bibliography).
  • Include the paper’s title and the unstructured abstract on the first page of the text itself.
  • Provide 5-6 key words below the abstract
  • For initial submissions, any standard social science in-text citation and bibliographic system is acceptable.

For more information, please visit the RSMCC website: www.emeraldinsight.com/series/rsmcc

Please forward and distribute this call widely.

Nominations — Penn State Democracy Medal

Each year, the Pennsylvania State University McCourtney Institute for Democracy gives a medal and $5,000 award for exceptional innovations that advance the design and practice of democracy. The medal celebrates and helps to publicize the best work being done by individuals or organizations to advance democracy in the United States or around the globe. The Institute gives medals in even-numbered years to recognize practical innovations, such as new institutions, laws, technologies, or movements that advance democracy. In odd-numbered years, the awards celebrate advances in democratic theory that provide richer philosophical or empirical conceptions of democracy. The Participatory Budgeting Project won the first medal in 2014 for the best innovation in the practice of democracy (see details at democracyinstitute.la.psu.edu).

Nominations will be accepted through December 10, 2014, and the awardee will be announced in the spring of 2015. The winning individual (or representative of a winning organization) will give a talk at Penn State in the fall of 2015, when they also receive their medal and $5,000 award. Between the spring announcement of the winner and the on-campus event in the fall, the Institute provides the recipient with professional editorial assistance toward completing a short (20-25 pages) essay describing the innovation for a general audience. Cornell University Press will publish the essay, which will be available to the general public at a very low price in electronic and print formats to aid the diffusion of the winning innovation.

Continue reading

CfP, “Social Movements and Place-Making in Global Cities,” Urban Affairs Association Annual Meeting, Miami, FL, April 8-11, 2015

In recent years, Occupy protests, the Indignados of Spain, and the Arab Spring uprisings have demonstrated that space, place, and territoriality matter for social movements. These movements drew much scholarly attention to the politics of place-making, highlighting the ways in which the intricacies of place shape and are shaped by social movement action. This call for panelists seeks papers that engage with questions related to place-making—the construction of place as material, symbolic and/or practical—by social movements around the world. How do social movement places affect urban landscapes? How do the spatial dynamics of urban social movements affect what those movements do? How can place-making processes effect social change in cities around the globe? How do the processes of globalization affect social movement efforts at place-making? For many contemporary social movements, the future appears uncertain and the possibilities for social change are shrinking, given the ever-increasing rules and regulations that characterize urban public life. Place-making can be crucial for enabling movement activities to grow, and develop. However, place-making is not only a means to an end, but an important process in its own right. By bringing place-making to the center of social movement analysis, this panel will raise important questions and debates about the relationship between place and social change in urban contexts.

Please send your name, affiliation, and abstract (300 words or less) to Kimberly Creasap (kac130@pitt.edu) by September 1, 2014.

*Full details on the UAA meeting can be found at: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/2015_call1.pdf

CfP, Mobilization Special Issue on Nonviolent Civil Resistance—Sharon Erickson Nepstad.

Sharon Erickson Nepstad will be guest editing a special issue of Mobilization, focusing on the theme of nonviolent civil resistance.  Mobilization is a leading international peer-reviewed journal of research about social and political movements, strikes, riots, protests, insurgencies, revolutions, and other forms of contentious politics. Its goal is to advance the systematic, scholarly, and scientific study of these phenomena, and to provide a forum for the discussion of methodologies, theories, and conceptual approaches across the disciplines. For this special issue, we encourage submissions on topics such as variations of nonviolent strategies across divergent political contexts and against diverse targets, the effects of repression on nonviolent movements, factors shaping the outcome of civil resistance struggles, tactical choices and shifts between armed and unarmed forms of struggle, how civil resistance affects conflict dynamics, long-term consequences of violent versus nonviolent struggle, and the international diffusion of nonviolent methods.  All submissions should be sent to Sharon Erickson Nepstad, guest editor, at nepstad@unm.edu. Submission deadline for this special issue is November 1, 2014.

Submissions should include the following: 1) a title page, containing full contact information for all authors; 2) an abstract of approximately 150 words; and 3) the manuscript (maximum length is 40 double spaced pages, not including tables and references).  Please remove all self-references in the text and in the bibliography.  All manuscripts must be sent as a Word document.  For more information about manuscript formatting and submission, please visit:http://www.mobilization.sdsu.edu/generalinfo/submit.html

New Book Series, Reproductive Justice—Zakiya Luna.

REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: A NEW VISION FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Call for Proposals

The new reproductive justice book series from University of California Press will publish works exploring the contours and content of reproductive justice.  The series will include primers aimed at students or people new to reproductive justice and books of original research.  Authors are invited to submit proposals that will engage activists, academics, and others. The first primer will be, What is Reproductive Justice? by Rickie Solinger and Loretta Ross. We are now accepting submissions for books featuring original research.

The phrase “reproductive justice” was coined in 1994 to describe an intersectional framework drawing attention to how the right to have a child and the right to parent are as important as the right to not have children. In the two decades since, RJ organizations and scholars have pursued a number of projects that pay close attention to the social, political, and environmental context in which sex, pregnancy, and parenthood are regulated.  

The RJ series is interested in original manuscripts that engage reproductive justice within a complex context. Topics could include:
•    abortion
•    assisted reproductive technology 
•    birthing options 
•    coerced obstetrics 
•    criminalization of reproduction 
•    drug use and parenting
•    environmental degradation and infertility 
•    incarcerated people and  reproductive rights 
•    population control 
•    queering family formation
•    youth parenting 

The RJ perspective and movement has provided a contemporary generation of activists and scholars – together with stalwart veterans— new energy.   This is an exciting time to consider the new vision for the 21st century that RJ offers.  The editors of the new series are seeking projects that reflect this vision and new energy.

Proposal Submission Procedures
A complete submission to the RJ book series will include 1) a book proposal of no more than 4,000 words, 2) a CV, and 3) one or two published writing samples. Please refer to the UC Press website for general book proposal elements and procedures. In addition, note that for book proposals for the RJ series the following items should be included: a market considerations section with discussion of pedagogical applications and innovative marketing ideas and an author biography section that describes previous work including, if relevant, connections with reproductive health, rights and justice organizing. We are not requesting manuscript chapters at this time, although additional information may be requested after initial review of submissions.

The RJ series is affiliated with the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. Thus, authors of original texts who secure contracts with the RJ book series will have the opportunity to apply for a Visiting Researcher affiliation with CRRJ that includes access to UCB resources such as writing space and library access that assist in completion of the manuscript. 

The RJ series editors and advisory board will review submissions and may request additional material before recommendation to UC Press editorial review. Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis, but for full consideration in the initial publication cycle, please submit by July 15, 2014. Please email submissions and any questions to all the series editors at rickie@wakeup-arts.com

Series editors:
Rickie Solinger, Historian (Senior Editor)
Khiara M. Bridges, Anthropology and Law, Boston University (Co-editor)
 Zakiya Luna, Sociology, UC Santa Barbara (Co-editor)

 More info on the UCP website (http://www.ucpress.edu/series.php?ser=rjnv)

CfP, Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change—Patrick G. Coy.

Call for Papers–Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change

“Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change,” an annual peer-reviewed volume of research, invites submissions for Volume 38 of the series. This volume will be non-thematic, i.e. submissions appropriate to any of the three broad foci reflected in the Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change (RSMCC) series title will be considered.

RSMCC is a fully peer-reviewed series of original research that has been published annually for over 35 years. We continue to publish the work of many of the leading scholars in social movements, social change, nonviolent action, and peace and conflict studies.
Although RSMCC enjoys a wide library subscription base for the book versions, all volumes are published not only in book form but are also available online through Emerald Social Science eBook Series Collection via subscribing libraries. This ensures wider distribution and easier access to your scholarship while maintaining the book series at the same time.

To be considered for inclusion in Volume 38, papers must arrive by September 7, 2014.  Earlier submissions are especially welcomed. Decisions are generally made within 8-12 weeks.
Send submission as a WORD document attached to an email to Patrick Coy, RSMCC editor, at pcoy@kent.edu. For initial submissions, any standard social science in-text citation and bibliographic system is acceptable. Remove all self-references in the text and in the bibliography. Word counts should generally not exceed 12,000 words, inclusive of supplemental materials (abstract, tables, bibliography, etc.). Include the paper’s title and an unstructured abstract on the first page of the text itself. Send a second file that contains the article title, the unstructured abstract, and full contact information for all authors.

RSMCC Website:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0163-786X

CfP, From Contention to Social Change–Eduardo Romanos.

Call for Papers

ESA Research Network 25 – Social Movements
Mid-term Conference
19-20 February 2015
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

From Contention to Social Change:
Rethinking the Consequences of Social Movements and Cycles of Protests

A considerable amount of recent research has been devoted to the effects of mobilization with the intent of specifying how social movements produce social changes of various sorts. Political outcomes – including the responsiveness of decision-makers – have been studied the most, but scholarly interest in other types of effects is also growing. Among the effects that have drawn the attention of scholars are the changed behavior of economic actors and market institutions (economic effects); opinions, beliefs and collective identities of the movements’ participants and of their audience (cultural impacts); as well as variations in the life-course of individuals who participate in movement activities (biographical consequences). Sometimes these effects are intentional and sometimes not.  In fact, on occasion they are contrary to the aims of those who produce them. Still, it is clear that contentious actions – whether they take the form of small local petitions, large street demonstrations or transnational campaigns mobilized on-line – transcend the internal life of social movements and have an influence on the rest of society.

Despite the abundance of research on these themes, some aspects of the consequences of social movements are still understudied.

First, while the role of the contentiousness of protest actions or the number of mobilized activists has been well-discussed, we know relatively little about how important the content of claims is for achieving movements’ goals. Framing has been shown to play a role in shaping political outcomes in some contexts, but more research could be done in this field. For example, how does the deliberative quality of the arguments made by the movement matter for the mobilization of further (the next wave) protests or for political outcomes?

Second, how does the success or failure of the movement affect the attitudes (e.g., perceived political efficacy and responsiveness) and future mobilization of the activists? There is, in general, little known about the failures and disengagement of social movements, but the consequences of such processes should be particularly noteworthy for those interested in the development of civil society.

Third, how the growing use of on-line media in social movement mobilization affect the consequences of social movements? For instance, does it lead to less sustainable mobilisation and thereby more failures? How does the use of Twitter or Facebook affect the cultural or biographical outcomes?

The mid-term conference of the ESA Research Network on Social Movements will focus on the preceding questions and welcomes both theoretical and empirical papers that tackle these and closely related issues. Single case studies and comparative studies are equally welcome.

Proposals should include the title of the proposed paper, an abstract of up to 300 words, the author’s name and affiliation. All abstracts should be in English.

The deadline for proposals is 30 September 2014 and they should be sent to both of the organizers (see email addresses below). Decisions will be communicated by 31 October. Participants will be asked to submit their papers no later than 19 January 2015.

The conference venue is the Complutense University’s TRANSOC Institute on Social Transformations, which is sited at the Escuela de Relaciones Laborales, in the city centre (San Bernardo 49, Madrid).

The conference organizers cannot pay for travel and accommodation expenses; however, attendance is free of charge and food and beverage will be provided in coffee breaks and lunchtime. Discount rates at hotels close to the conference venue will be available for participants.

For more information: http://socialmovementsconference.wordpress.com

The conference organizers and Research Network chairs are:

Eduardo Romanos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (eromanos@ucm.es)

Katrin Uba, Uppsala University (katrin.uba@statsvet.uu.se)

________________________________

Dr. Eduardo Romanos
Ramón y Cajal Fellow
Department of Sociology I
Universidad Complutense de Madrid

CFP, “Social Media and Social Movements”– Galina Selivanova

CFP, “Social Media and Social Movements”– Galina Selivanova.

Laboratory for Internet Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Social Media and Social Movements

September 18-19, St. Petersburg, Russia

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Laboratory for Internet Studies is pleased to announce a call for papers for its second conference on the Internet and social media, titled “Social Media and Social Movements,” to be held in St. Petersburg, Russia, on September 18-19, 2014.

The rise of social media simultaneously opened new opportunities for “traditional” (face-to-face) social movements and proved a platform for online movements that have weak (if any) offline activities. The relationship between social media and social movements calls for revision of ‘classic’ research topics that have been studied by social movement scholars (e.g. the role of social media in mobilization, protest and coalitions building), as well as a reflection on completely new questions that have resulted from the emergence of online movements (e.g. what is the social space of online-movements, what are the forms of virtual activities).

The conference is aimed at the emerging – and vibrant – interdisciplinary community of scholars interested in digital society – a society where social life is embedded in rapidly developing communication technologies and media. This year, we focus on how social movements have been transformed by user-generated online activities and what impact these transformed movements have had on broader social processes. Specifically, we plan to discuss the impact of social media on social movements with regards to resource mobilization, collective action frames, construction of collective identities, and (possible) radicalization. Other topics include but are not limited to social media and political participation, the role of social media in street protests, global social movements, repertoires of online activism, social media and social movement outcomes, the social space of online movements, and methodological developments in research on social media and social movements.

We welcome abstracts on any of the above topics, and any other topics that analyze relationships between social media and social movements. Abstracts of proposed papers should be no more than 300 words in length. Abstracts must include the name of the proposer, title, his/her affiliation, postal and e-mail addresses.

Keynote speakers

Robert Ackland, Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks, Australian National University
Maria Petrova, Graduate School of Economics, Barcelona

Keynote of practice: (to be announced)

Program committee:

Sandra Gonzales-Bailon, Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania
Jennifer Earl, Center for Information Technology and Society, University of Arizona
Peng Hwa Ang, Singapore Internet Research Center
William Dutton, Oxford Internet Institute (to be confirmed)
Ivan Klimov, Center for New Media and Society, New Economic School, Moscow
Benjamin Lind, Department of sociology, Higher School of Economics, Moscow
Nikita Basov, Centre for German and European Studies, St. Petersburg State University (to be confirmed)
Peter Meylakhs, Laboratory for Internet Studies, Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg
Olessia Koltsova, Laboratory for Internet Studies, Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg

Local program and organizing committee:

Peter Meylakhs (Chair),Olessia Koltsova, Svetlana Bodrunova, Sergey Nikolenko, Sergei Koltcov, Nora Kirkizh, Galina Selivanova, Daria Yudenkova.

Requirements for submission can be found at the Registration page.

Deadline for submissions is May 20, 2014.

Notifications of acceptance: June 16, 2014

Extended abstracts of three pages (to be published on the conference website) should be submitted by August 16, 2014

The conference website: http://linisevents.hse.ru/

Home page of Laboratory for Internet Studies: http://linis.hse.ru/

____________

Best Regards,
Galina Selivanova,
Member of Organizing Committee

CFP: ECPR General Conference, Glasgow, 3-6 September 2014– Maria Grasso and Marco Giugni

Please find below a call for papers for the section on ‘Citizens’ Resilience in Times of Crisis’ at the next ECPR General Conference to be held in Glasgow on 3-6 September 2014.  The Section includes eight panels. See below for Panel Abstracts and Panel Chair e-mail contact details to send abstracts. Please feel free to circulate in your networks.

Paper proposals should be sent to panel chairs on or before 10 February 2014 (see below for email addresses).

Many thanks and looking forward to seeing you in Glasgow,
Maria Grasso and Marco Giugni

Section title: Citizens’ Resilience in Times of Crisis

Section chair: Marco Giugni (University of Geneva)

Section co-chair: Maria Grasso (University of Sheffield)

Deadline for paper proposals to panel chairs (see e-mail details below): 10 February 2014

The section includes eight panels (see below for Panel Abstracts and Panel Chair e-mail details to propose a paper):

Panel 1: Changing interactions between publics and policies in times of crises

Panel chair: Manlio Cinalli (Sciences Po Paris)

Panel 2: Political responsiveness in times of crisis

Panel chair: Katrin Uba (Uppsala University)

Panel 3: Political violence in times of economic crisis

Panel chairs: Lorenzo Bosi and Lorenzo Zamponi (European University Institute)

Panel 4: Economic crises and social citizenship

Panel chair: Maria Theiss (University of Warsaw)

Panel 5: Economic crises and the rise of populism

Panel chair: Jordi Muñoz (Autonomous University of Barcelona)

Panel 6: Citizens’ political responses to economic crises: Grievances or opportunities?

Panel chair: Maria Grasso (University of Sheffield)

Panel 7: Resource-poor people in times of crisis

Christian Lahusen (University of Siegen)

Panel 8: Alternative forms of resilience in times of crisis

Maria Kousis (University of Crete)

Section Abstract

This section aims to provide evidence-based knowledge about citizens’ resilience in times of economic crises allowing for providing more effective policy responses to the negative consequences of such crises. It examines in particular the ways in which European citizens have reacted to the crisis that, at different degree of intensity in different countries, struck Europe since 2008, but also how they deal with economic crises and their consequences more generally. This may encompass a wide range of strategies and forms of resilience by citizens, from exiting from the political sphere and withdrawing from political engagement to voicing their concerns and engage in political action. It may also refer to citizens who choose different channels and strategies to make their voice heard as an active reaction to crises. Not only can they engage in political action and protest, but they may seek access to justice at various levels (from local to European and international) and take part in the associational life of their community. Economic crises may also open up new opportunities for political parties – in particular, right-wing populist parties – which voters might consider as providing attractive solutions to cope with the negative consequences of the crisis. In addition, citizens might develop new attitudes and practices towards the economic system, society at large, and their own place within it. Studies show the existence of a wide repertoire of non-capitalist practices that involve citizens lowering their cost of living, connecting to other communities and assisting others. Alternative forms of resilience include the strengthening of social and family networks and community practices to foster solidarity in the face of crises, change of lifestyles towards more sustainable forms of consumption and production, developing new artistic expressions, moving abroad for short or long durations (or on the contrary reducing mobility). In brief, the section examines both individual and collective responses by citizens, both the private and the public dimensions of such responses, and both political and non-political responses. In addition, special attention will be paid to new and alternative forms of resilience in times of crises.

The section relates to the EU-funded project LIVEWHAT (Living with Hard Times: How European Citizens Deal with Economic Crises and Their Social and Political Consequences), which is coordinated by the section chair. The aim is to create a dialogue as well as a cross-fertilization of finding between the research outputs of this project and the wider scholarly community working in this field, also with the aim of establishing a research network of scholars working on this topic. The section is supported by the Standing Group on Participation and Mobilization. Panel 3 is also part of the section on Forms of Political Violence.

Panel 1: Changing interactions between publics and policies in times of crises

Panel chair: Manlio Cinalli (Sciences Po Paris)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to manlio.cinalli@sciencespo.fr  

This panel deals with relational mechanisms at the meso-level beyond the consideration of policy change at the macro- level and variations of political behaviour in time of crisis. The current crisis is often discussed in terms of its bad impact on a number of ‘deviant’ forms of political behaviour, in particular, electoral abstention, political aphasia, or alternatively, affiliation to left/right extreme movements/parties (and the recourse to extreme forms of political mobilisation). The increasing call for a ‘normalised’ political inclusion is also bringing about many calls for reforms in terms of labour market, social policy, access to citizenship, as well as specific policies targeting the most vulnerable groups. Yet, relational dynamics stand out as a crucial filter between channels for political access, flow of resources, and identities on the one hand, and both the micro- (individuals) and the meso- (organisations) levels of political participation on the other hand. Attention on these relational dynamics allows for assessing the roles and positions of a large number of different actors –—including policy-makers, political elites, movements of citizens, vulnerable groups, organisations mobilising on their behalf, as well as various civil society stakeholders.

Going beyond an approach looks especially at associational membership as an ‘individual’ attribute that impacts upon the political participation of ‘individuals’, this panel thus looks at relational dynamics across the public domain and the policy domain, considering different types of actors, and possibly, different policy and issue fields. The relationship between the domain of policy-making and the public domain of political intervention considers that these two domains are independent from each other, without the assumption that one affects necessarily the other. Accordingly, the panel can assess the extent to which variations of political participation in times of crisis, both at the micro- and at the meso-level, can be linked to specific relational mechanisms, which filter the impact of more ‘distant’ explanans. This panel welcomes empirical papers dealing with both national and sub-national spaces, as well as theoretical papers questioning the nature of the relationship between policy-making and (sub)national publics in times of crisis.

Panel 2: Political responsiveness in times of crisis

Panel chair: Katrin Uba (Uppsala University)

Discussant: Laura Morales (University of Leicester)

Send abstracts to katin.uba@uu.se

Protests against government policies are not rare although at the time of economic crisis there are probably more reasons for protests and therefore also move contentious mobilization. Policy-makers are blamed if they are not proposing any plans for remedying the citizens’ difficulties or if they do propose some too radical austerity plans. The interesting question, especially in the contexts of democratic governments, is the authorities’ responsiveness to such citizens’ protests. Do activists actually achieve what they ask for (a new constitution, regulation, legislation or a resignation of a politician) or do their efforts fail and governments continue with their policies? More importantly, in what context these processes take place? Can we say that at the time of crisis there is more policy responsiveness because of all the insecurity? Or is the situation opposite and governments are rather following the requests of the international community than their own protesting citizens? Is the short term success actually an achievement the activists looked for and what are the unintended political consequences of contentious actions in times of crisis.

This panel welcomes papers that deal with the above outlined questions and systematically examine the governments’ long and short term responsiveness to citizens’ demands in times of crisis, particularly to such demands that are expressed via non-electoral forms of actions. Comparative papers are particularly welcome, but even interesting case studies, which help to improve our understanding of political responsiveness, are very welcome.

Panel 3: Political violence in times of economic crisis

Panel chairs: Lorenzo Bosi (European University Institute)

Panel co-chair: Lorenzo Zamponi (European University Institute)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to lorenzo.bosi@eui.eu and lorenzo.zamponi@eui.eu

The goal of this panel is to advance the understanding of political violence in times of economic crisis. In order to do this we are concerned with addressing the following interrelated research questions: How do violent repertoires of contention relate to the context of economic crisis? Does economic hardship provide incentives to the use of violent tactics? Which forms of political violence are most widely used in this context? Why, and with which outcomes? How does the context of economic crisis impact on the level of socially tolerated violence and on the individuals’ availability to certain tactics? Which kind of justification of political violence is pursued in times of economic crisis? Which political groups are more likely to turn to violence in this context? How do security forces react to political violence in time of crisis? We welcome submissions coming from different disciplinary fields, in the attempt to bridge the scholarship on political violence with the empirical analysis of the social outcomes of the economic crisis. Each abstract will be evaluated for: quality and clarity of the research question; methodological precision in the comparative approach; theoretically original contribution and discussion of available knowledge; relevance and pertinence to the workshop’s themes.

Panel 4: Economic crises and social citizenship

Panel chair: Maria Theiss (University of Warsaw)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to m.theiss@uw.edu.pl

Economic crises, and particularity current economic recession starting in 2008, have caused far-reaching decrease in citizens’ social security. As a result changes occur in two intertwined spheres of citizens’ political participation and welfare state functioning. Thus, there are at least three (new) forms of pressure to the welfare state: need to adjust the protective measures, responding to rising citizens’ claims and the growing scarcity of financial resources.

The aim of the panel is to address the issues of welfare state changes from the citizenship perspective. It focuses on the change of social rights, and particularly on the following questions: If the balance between social rights and social responsibilities shifts, and if so how? What changes regarding universalism, generosity and scope of risks covered occur in spite of crisis? How the (re)defining of social entitlement shapes the new boundaries of a political community? For the purpose of the panel the broad notion of social citizenship is presumed, which includes formal social rights, but also informal practices, including the use of discretion rules and street-level democracy on both national and local level.

Papers are welcome which apply the theoretical perspective of social citizenship in its various versions, ranging from classical ones to more recent post-structuralist or feminist notions to (comparative) analyses of welfare state changes related to crisis. The papers may refer to general or specific policy fields (e.g. social security system, labour market policies, family policies) and related changes on national or local level.

Panel 5: Economic crises and the rise of populism

Panel chair: Jordi Muñoz (Autonomous University of Barcelona)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to jordi.munoz@uab.cat

Economic turmoil has often been connected with the rise of populist political movements and parties. Unemployment and other personal and social consequences of economic crises have been found to favor vote for extreme-right parties and participation in populist movements. However, this is not a universal implication of economic downturns: even within the current European crsis we find a great deal of variation in terms of the rise of such parties and movements, across and within countries. Therefore, we are interested in understanding under what conditions do economic crises breed populism. The panel welcomes comparative research focused on the contextual and invididual factors that condition this relationship, as well as case-studies that provide insights on the causal mechanisms that link crises with increased support for extreme right and populist parties and movements.

Panel 6: Citizens’ political responses to economic crises: Grievances or opportunities?

Panel chair: Maria Grasso (University of Sheffield)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to m.grasso@sheffield.ac.uk

Do economic crises lead to greater or lesser political participation? Do grievances lead to protest and other forms of unconventional political engagement? Or rather, does the experience of economic crisis lead people to exit the political sphere? How does this vary for the conventional and unconventional political domains? And what about membership of SMOs and NGOs? Do findings apply to the general population or only to those groups most hard hit by the economic crisis? Grievances and relative deprivation have been increasingly dismissed as explanations for political protest. Instead, mobilization models emphasizing the importance of resources, political opportunities, and the construction of ideological frames for political solidarity have received more support. But may hardships stemming from economic crisis rather spur political engagement as recent waves of contention seem to suggest? What is the role of absolute and relative deprivation? In relation to which reference group(s) should the latter be understood?

To address these important questions for understanding political participation in times of crisis, this panel invites papers addressing the political responses of citizens to economic crises, and in particular the role of grievances and opportunities for explaining such responses. Both individual-level and collective-level analyses can be proposed, insofar as they focus on political responses to economic crises. Empirical comparative studies are particularly welcome. Some further research questions that could be considered include: How do different types of European citizens construct economic crisis and how does this relate to their political participation? Do European citizens feel the at the European Union’s reactions to the economic crises have been adequate? Do they feel more confident or less confident in the European Union as a result and does this have any repercussions on their political activism?  Are there important differences across social groups and countries in constructions of crisis and in citizens’ political reactions? Is the role of grievances and/or opportunities more important in some contexts than others?

Panel 7: Resource-poor people in times of crisis

Panel chair: Christian Lahusen (University of Siegen)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to lahusen@soziologie.uni-siegen.de

The past decades have provided ample evidence for the ability of poorly resourced people (e.g., the unemployed, working poor, undocumented workers and migrants) to protest on their behalf, thus overcoming their state of social and political marginalization. The economic and political crisis spreading throughout Europe since 2008 has not terminated these mobilizations, as illustrated by protest waves in the European South (e.g., Portugal, Spain and Greece). Individual cases have received ample consideration (e.g., the Spanish ‘Indignados’), but no consistent picture has been portrayed so far.

This panel aims at studying these protests in a more systematic manner by presenting, analyzing and discussing available evidence from various mobilization waves. It proposes to address a number of relevant questions. On the one hand, it is necessary to assess the role of poorly resourced people in the protests against the hardships of the crisis and the policies advanced by the European Union and national governments to combat economic recession. In how far were deprived people proactively involved in these protests? Where they able to stabilize their mobilization across time? And are we speaking primarily of local events, or did protests develop a national and/or European range of activity? On the other hand, it will be interesting to discuss conditions, mechanisms and consequences of these protests. Do times of crisis provide more favorable conditions for the mobilization of the poorly resourced people by increasing the relevance of their claims, expanding the range of allies and improving public support, or do we need to acknowledge also new impediments? What does the varying intensity of protests across the European Union tell us in comparative terms about beneficial or inhibitive conditions? What can we learn about the conditions of a successful scale-shift of local protests of poorly resourced people towards the national and/or European level? And can we say anything about the outcomes of these protests, i.e., does the mobilization of the people most severely hit by the economic crisis have any impact on public policies at local, national or European level? We invite papers that address these questions and allow deepening our empirical and theoretical knowledge. While the focus will be on poorly resourced people, the panel is open to research about different constituencies, policy issues and countries. Comparative papers are particularly welcome, but also relevant case studies.

Panel 8: Alternative forms of resilience in times of crisis

Panel chair: Maria Kousis (University of Crete)

Discussant: TBA

Send abstracts to kousis.m@uoc.gr

The aim of this panel is to contribute to the study of collective responses to economic and political threats as they are reflected in alternative forms of economic and noneconomic activities by citizens confronting hard economic times and falling rights, especially since the global financial crisis of 2008.

Expanding world-wide, collective responses to economic threats under neoliberal policies, tend to cover basic and urgent needs relate to food, shelter, health, childcare and education. Alternative collective actions and initiatives of resilience include: solidarity-based exchanges and networks, cooperative structures, barter clubs and networks, credit unions, ethical banks, time banks, alternative social currency, citizens’ self-help groups, presumption practices, social enterprises, and others.

Related studies center on innovative practices (e.g. clubes de trueque) which sprang during the economic crisis in Argentina and other Latin America regions. Nevertheless, similar initiatives have developed in Europe before and after the crisis of 2008 – e.g. the SOL social currency Project in France; regional currencies support by NGOs in Germany aiming to support local economies; the flourishing of local currencies and barter networks in Greece and Spain; the alternative cashless production and exchange systems Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS) in the UK; and, Ethical banks promoting ethical commitment, ideology and principles.

These alternative practices attest to a new kind of politics through the creation of bottom-up participatory initiatives promoting a ‘solidarity economy’,   as seen in countries confronting crises in the past.  Papers addressing such alternative forms of resilience at a theoretical, comparative, or empirical level would be most suitable.

CFA, Special Issue of International Labor and Working-Class History–Joel Stillerman

Call for Abstracts: Precarious Labor in Global Perspective — A special issue of International Labor and Working-class History (ILWCH)

We invite abstracts for this ILWCH special issue focused on the dynamics and history of precarious work around the world in global context.  Definitions of precarious work vary, but a wide range of observers agree that in many settings jobs have become worse in terms of employment security, access to social benefits, and protection of labor rights.  This is especially true in the Global North, where the 1970s marked the beginning of a shift away from relatively stable postwar labor relations based on long-term employment (along with highly gendered employment patterns) and a developed welfare state.  Numerous analysts have explored these changes in work, including the International Labor Organization’s many publications on precarious and decent work; Arne Kalleberg in Good Jobs, Bad Jobs; Tony Avirgan et al. in Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs, Françoise Carré et al. in Are Bad Jobs Inevitable?; and many others.

We seek articles that examine the dynamics and history of precarious work, focused on where, how, and why it has emerged, how contemporary precarious work differs (or not) from earlier low quality and unstable work (including work in the Global North before the Fordist era), the link between precariousness and long-term changes such as globalization and neoliberalism, as well as whether and how shorter-term effects such as the recent global slowdown have altered work’s character.  Our goal is to include analyses from around the world and different eras that place precarious work in a global historical context.  In addition to analyses from the Global North, we especially welcome studies from the Global South, NICs, BRICs, transitional economies, and others, including cases where precarious work may be receding due to economic, social, and political change.  We are particularly interested in articles, including comparative ones, that examine connections between precariousness and changes in the global division of labor, forms of business organization, configuration of geopolitics, and immigration flows, as well as counter-movements of regulation and resistance. Though changes in public sector employment are noteworthy in many countries, we will limit our attention to the private sector to sharpen the issue’s focus.

Possible topics for articles include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

·         How the shift of industrial activity to new locales, and from integrated production to global supply chains, has reshaped the quality of work around the world vs. earlier industrialization.

·         Precariousness in growing service sector industries (both low-skill and professional), including how it differs from earlier precariousness, how it varies around the world, and why.

·         Precarious work in agriculture and other primary sectors, including how commodities booms, migration, trade integration, and other processes have shaped these changes

·         Mechanisms separating and stratifying precarious work from decent work, and sorting workforce populations between one and the other.

·         Top-down and bottom-up strategies and struggles to intensify precariousness and exploitation or, conversely, to reverse, limit, or transform precariousness.

·         Comparisons of companies, sectors, or countries with regard to these and other topics.

Prospective authors should send a letter and an abstract of no more than 500 words of work they wish to submit to the journal. Editors will determine whether the proposed work fits thematically in an upcoming issue. The deadline for abstracts is June 1, 2014.  Style and submission guidelines will be sent to authors whose work the editors wish to review.

Send correspondence to:

Editor, International Labor and Working-Class History

c/o The Harry Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies
SUNY Empire State College
325 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

or via e-mail to: ILWCH@esc.eduSarah.Mosoetsa@wits.ac.zastillerman.joel6@gmail.com,tilly@ucla.edu