Highlander’s Mission: Social Justice

by Aldon Morris, Northwestern University

from Critical Mass, Volume 44, Issue 1

The historically important Highlander Research and Education Center was deliberately attacked. On March 29, 2019, an early morning fire destroyed its executive office building along with historic documents, speeches, artifacts and memorabilia stored there. Although an investigation of the arson continues, all indications point to a white supremacy group as the perpetrator.

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How “More Cowbell, More Cowbell” Worked! Disruptive Tactics and the Outcome of the UIUC Labor Protest

by Amirhossein Teimouri, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

from Critical Mass, Volume 44, Issue 1

In late February 2018, I found myself joining fellow graduate students in a strike on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). The strike at the UIUC was a rare opportunity for a student-led labor movement to rise against the corporatization of the public education. Although this was a campus-wide movement without nation-wide repercussions, participants and activists integrated the movement to a broader nation-wide public education unrest.

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Social Media in a Controversial Student Election: New Frontiers for Political Strife

by Anson Au, University of Toronto

from Critical Mass, Volume 44, Issue 1

During the 2018-2019 academic year, Carol (name changed to protect her identity) ran for student president at one of the largest universities in Canada. Her platform was dressed up in the usual rhetoric for campaigns in student elections: fighting for more resources for students, ensuring students’ voices were heard and represented, and so on. But Carol was also vocal in advocating for the freedom of an ethnic group in China, making the controversial claim that the territory should be politically autonomous and separated from China and that the cultural history of this ethnic group was so distinct that they deserved independence.

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Students vs. Tuition Hikes

by Didem Türkoğlu, UNC Chapel Hill

from Critical Mass, Volume 44, Issue 1

Students protest tuitions. Perhaps more so than ever. The photos from the protests in Chile, Canada, and South Africa come to mind quickly. Then there are less globally covered student protests in Germany and Turkey. What makes these student protests so significant? In a forthcoming special issue in Current Sociology, scholars focus on case studies from the global north and the global south to provide answers to this question.

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Student Activism Shaping the Preservation of Confederate Monuments at UNC-Chapel Hill

by Emily H.A. Yen, Trinity College

from Critical Mass, Volume 44, Issue 1

The violent death of Heather Heyer at the Unite the Right rally lead by torch-carrying White nationalists protesting the proposed removal of a Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia shifted the national discourse around White supremacy and the public display of Confederate monuments. Confederate monuments are particularly controversial since the vast majority of them were built after the Supreme Court upheld the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision (Southern Poverty Law Center 2019) and were a way for White southerners to venerate an alternative narrative of the origins of the Civil War and assert racial dominance in the Jim Crow South. The United Daughters of the Confederacy’s fundraising of the 8-foot bronze statue on University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s (UNC) campus and its dedication by Julian Carr, a UNC Trustee and Confederate veteran who supported the Ku Klux Klan, in 1913 reflects this larger movement (Farzan 2018). The statue known as “Silent Sam” has been a focal point of recent campus debates around racial justice, White supremacy, and free speech, but generations of UNC students have been protesting its presence on campus for over 50 years. The most recent wave of student activism led to the statue’s physical toppling in August 2018 and spurred an ongoing debate around the preservation of its symbolic legacy.

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Fall 2018 issue of Critical Mass Now Online!

The Fall 2018 issue of CriticalMass is now online! Contents include:

Message from the Chair
Fandom as a Method of Social Movement Recruitment
Abortion Online: How Non-Partisan Media Still Builds a Polarized Internet
Trolls in #ShoutYourAbortion
Women March Across the Globe
Section Notes: The Impact of the Mentoring Program
Section Notes: Mentoring Committee Update
ASA 2018: Non-State Opposition to and Suppression of Social Movements
ASA 2018: Revisiting Threats and Grievances in the Trump Era
ASA 2018: Methodological Advances in Social Movements
Recent Publications
CBSM Awards 2018
Calls for Papers & Other Opportunities

43-2 Critical Mass Bulletin – Fall 2018

43-2 References – Fall 2018

Critical Mass: Fall 2017

The Fall 2017 issue of Critical Mass is now available online:

42-2 Critical Mass Bulletin – Fall 2017

In This Issue
Message from the Chair
In Memoriam: Greg Maney
Why Can’t We All Just Get Along? Factionalism in Animal Rights
Memory Activism: Reimagining the past for Future Activism in Israel
ASA 2017: Leadership, Strategy, and Organization in Social Movements
ASA 2017: Consequences of Social Movements
Recent Publications
CBSM Awards 2017
Calls for Papers & Other Opportunities