Critical Mass

Critical Mass is the newsletter of the Section of Collective Behavior and Social Movements. The current editors are Daniel McClymonds and Stacy Williams. Please send all your ideas, feedback, and submissions to cbsmnews@gmail.com.

Summer 2018 Critical Mass

The summer 2018 Critical Mass newsletter is now online! This issue includes profiles of 2018 CBSM Junior Scholars Job Candidates.

Summer 2018 Critical Mass

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Critical Mass: Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 issue of Critical Mass is now live!

43 - 1 Critical Mass Bulletin Spring 2018 [Final]

In this issue:

Message from the Chair
The Future of #Resistance
Candlelight Protests in South KoreaProgressive Religion and the Women’s March on Chicago
Virginia Indivisible Local Groups
Recent Publications
Art of the March: International Women’s March Sign Archive
CBSM-Related Events at ASA 2018

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Critical Mass: Fall 2017

The Fall 2017 issue of Critical Mass is now available online:

42-2 Critical Mass Bulletin - Fall 2017

In This Issue
Message from the Chair
In Memoriam: Greg Maney
Why Can’t We All Just Get Along? Factionalism in Animal Rights
Memory Activism: Reimagining the past for Future Activism in Israel
ASA 2017: Leadership, Strategy, and Organization in Social Movements
ASA 2017: Consequences of Social Movements
Recent Publications
CBSM Awards 2017
Calls for Papers & Other Opportunities

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SPECIAL ISSUE: 2017 CBSM JUNIOR SCHOLARS JOB MARKET CANDIDATES

This special issue of Critical Mass highlights the accomplishments of junior CBSM scholars on the job market as of summer 2017.

CriticalMassBulletin_42_Summer17

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Hints of the Coming of the Women’s Marches

By Jo Reger, Oakland University

As someone who studies the contemporary U.S. feminist movement, I should not have been surprised by the global outpouring of protests on January 21, 2017. After all, you could feel the rumblings coming during the Clinton-Trump campaign. The outright misogyny of Donald Trump’s casual evaluation of women, in contrast to the empowered women rhetoric of Hillary Clinton. Emotions were running high, insults were being flung, and once agreeable neighbors began to argue with each other’s choice of yard signs.

But stepping back from the heat of those moments, there were seeds planted for the global spread of women’s marches long before Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton threw their hats in the electoral ring.  Drawing on the old adage “hindsight is twenty-twenty,” I offer a few examples that offered hints of the women’s marches to come:

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