Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Volume eleven, issue one of Interface, a peer-reviewed online journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. The overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.

Like all issues of Interface, this issue is free and open-access. You can download articles individually or a complete PDF of the issue (4.29 MB). This issue of Interface includes 259 pages and 14 pieces.

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Symposium: Corporate Power and Local Democracy

Just out from the Journal of World-Systems Research is a symposium on corporate power and local democracy that deals centrally with the role of community-based movements in confronting global capitalism. The six essays featured in the symposium consider specific community conflicts with corporations over water and petro-carbon as part of larger translocal struggles, and address up broader strategies for asserting democratic control over economic life. This symposium was edited by Ben Manski and includes contributions from Jackie Smith, Theo Lequesne, Richard Flacks, Caitlin Schroering, Thomas Hanna, Barry Feldman and Mason Herson-Hurd.

See JW-SR 25:1 at: https://jwsr.pitt.edu/ojs/index.php/jwsr/issue/view/74

Revisiting the Riot: A Theory in Action Special Issue to mark the 10th Anniversary of AK Thompson’s Black Bloc, White Riot

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: SEPTEMBER 15, 2019

see: http://transformativestudies.org/publications/theory-in-action-the-journal-of-tsi/call-for-papers/

About the Special Issue:

Published a decade after the 1999 “Battle of Seattle,” AK Thompson’s Black Bloc, White Riot explored the connection between political subjectivity and violence. By engaging with the movement’s internal contradictions and conflicts, taking up its classed, gendered, and racialized dynamics as points for exploring the role of violence in politics, it remains a challenging intervention into the movement’s voluminous ‘post-mortem’ literature. 

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New Book: The Palgrave Handbook of Social Movements, Revolution, and Social Transformation

See: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319923536

Just published Palgrave, edited by Berch Berberoglu, this handbook addresses some of the key issues related to the nature and dynamics of social movements and revolutions as the basis for the transformation of society. It provides the latest research and analysis on a variety of social movements on a global scale, with focus on major social movements and revolutions of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

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RSVP: McCarthy Award 2019

Invitation to McCarthy Award Ceremony Honoring Suzanne Staggenborg (RSPV Now!)

The Notre Dame Center for the Study of Social Movements cordially invites you to attend events in honor of Suzanne Staggenborg.  Suzanne will receive the John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship of Social Movements and Collective Behavior on May 4, 2019.

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Call for Papers: Seattle+20, Movements at the Millennium

Special Issue of the journal, Socialism and Democracy

Summary. Twenty years after the so-called “Battle in Seattle” and the millennial turn, we seek papers that help explain the 1990s-2010s period of struggle in the United States. In particular we are interested in accounts and analyses of the popular movements of this period and the different frameworks informing these mobilizations. Socialism and Democracy is a peer reviewed academic and practice-based journal that brings together the worlds of scholarship and activism, theory and practice, to examine in depth the core issues and popular movements of our time. Abstracts for this issue are due March 15th and full manuscripts are due May 1st of 2019; please see “How to Submit,” below, for details.

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Addressing intersectionality: social movements and the politics of inclusivity

Workshop organizers: Elizabeth Evans, Goldsmiths, University of London, Ilana Eloit, London School of Economicsn and Eléonore Lépinard, University of Lausanne

Eleonore.Lepinard@unil.ch , Elizabeth.evans@gold.ac.uk , i.m.eloit@lse.ac.uk

All papers for our workshop must be submitted via MyECPR:

https://ecpr.eu/Login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fEvents%2fEventDetails.aspx%3fEventID%3d112

We will not be able to approve any papers that are submitted directly to us, as they will need to be in the system.  Feel free to contact us if you have any queries.

For submission guidelines and further instructions, please visit the ECPR website:

https://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=112

The deadline for paper proposals is Wednesday 6th December.

Workshop outline:

Social movements play a critical role in local, national and international politics, mobilising a range of diverse groups and interests. Exploring who is included and who is excluded within these movements is a critical project. It is a task that requires an intersectional lens to examine how multiple and overlapping points of oppression shape power dynamics within social movements. Such an approach, enables scholars to identify the challenges that a lack of heterogeneity poses to the legitimacy, accountability and representational functions of social movement politics.

With historical and theoretical roots in Black feminism and women of color activism, intersectionality is a concept forged to address concerns relating to inclusivity and representation in social movement (Davis 1981, hooks 1981, Moraga and Anzaldúa 1981, Lorde 1984, Crenshaw 1989).  More than four decades later, acknowledging diversity, inequalities invisibilities, as well as desires to “organize on one’s own” (Roth 2004) amongst political activists has become increasingly important to gender and politics, LGBTQI+ politics, and race and politics scholars; many of whom argue that identifying and analyzing power dynamics between and amongst different identity groups is critical to exploring issues of access and inclusion within civil society movements (e.g. Crenshaw 1991, Strolovitch 2008, Springer 2005).

However, this call for an intersectional perspective on social movement’s discourses, practices and politics of alliances and conflicts is far from being systematically adopted by social movements scholars. Whilst intersectionality has constituted a paradigm shift in gender studies (Hancock, 2007), and has become increasingly important for scholars of race and ethnicity as well as LGBTQI politics (Kearl, 2015), it is not clear whether those active within other types of social movement, or those studying them, also take account of difference and the interactive effects of identity markers and structural inequalities. While research exploring intersectionality and social movements will necessarily appeal to scholars of women’s, civil rights, labor unions, migrant rights and LGBTQI+ movements; issues of inclusion, accessibility and accountability are critical for all of those working on social movement studies.

The purpose of this workshop is to develop a new research network that is dedicated to exploring the conceptual, empirical and methodological challenges and opportunities that applying an intersectional framework offers to scholars of social movement studies who are looking to apply it to new areas. Hence, this research network will bring together those working on empirical and theoretical studies that examine a range of different social movements, in order to develop new ways of thinking about, and applying, intersectionality. Read More